Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):277-298 (2014)

Abstract
Cheating in the undergraduate classroom is not a new problem, and it is recognized as one that is endemic to the education system. This paper examines the highly normative behavior of using unauthorized assistance (e.g., a solutions manual or a friend) on an individual assignment within the context of an upper division undergraduate course in engineering mechanics. The findings indicate that there are varying levels of accepting responsibility among the students (from denial to tempered to full) and that acceptance of responsibility can lead to identification of learning and necessary behavioral changes. The findings have implications for institutions and engineering faculty, in particular the need for consistent academic integrity education and the teaching of professional integrity and ethics
Keywords Cheating  Engineering  Professional ethics
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1007/s11948-013-9435-6
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 71,290
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

View all 8 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Classroom Cheating Among Natural Science and Engineering Majors.Donald L. McCabe - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):433-445.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-03-17

Total views
17 ( #639,009 of 2,519,267 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #407,861 of 2,519,267 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes