An Acrostic in Vergil ( Aeneid 7. 601–4)?

Classical Quarterly 33 (01):298- (1983)
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Abstract

In any competition for monuments of wasted labour the collection of accidental acrostics in Latin poets published by I. Hilberg would stand a good chance of a prize. But amongst his examples of ‘neckische Spiele des Zufalls’ is one I am gullible enough to believe may be more significant. In Aeneid 7. 601–15 Vergil describes the custom of opening the gates of war in a long anacoluthic sentence, the first four lines of which run: Mos erat Hesperio in Latio, quern protinus urbes Albanae coluere sacrum, nunc maxima rerum Roma colit, cum prima movent in proelia Mortem, Sive Getis inferre manu lacrimabile bellum…

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Two Acrostics in Horace's Satires.Talitha Kearey - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):734-744.
An Acrostic in Aeneid 11.902–6.Paul K. Hosle - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):908-910.

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