Economic Regulation of Next-Generation Sequencing

Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (s1):51-66 (2014)
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Abstract

The genetic testing industry is in a period of potentially major structural change driven by several factors. These include weaker patent protections after Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics and Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc.; a continuing shift from single-gene tests to genome-scale sequencing; and a set of February 2014 amendments to the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 regulations and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Privacy Rule. This article explores the nature of these changes and why they strain existing regulatory frameworks for protecting patients, research subjects, and other consumers who receive genetic testing.Oversight of genetic testing has, at least to date, had two major thrusts: privacy and ethical protections and traditional consumer health and safety regulations. Examples of the first are the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act and the HIPAA Privacy Rule, which after 2013 amendments expressly protects genetic privacy as well as other medical privacy.

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Regulation of Next Generation Sequencing.Gail H. Javitt & Katherine Strong Carner - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (s1):9-21.

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Regulation of Next Generation Sequencing.Gail H. Javitt & Katherine Strong Carner - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (s1):9-21.

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