Accounting for the Data: Intuitions in Moral Theory Selection

Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):761-774 (2014)
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Abstract

Reflective equilibrium is often credited with extending the idea of accounting for the data from its familiar home in the sciences to the realm of moral philosophy. But careful consideration of the main concepts of this idea—the data to be accounted for and the kind of accounting it is appropriate to expect of a moral theory—leads to a revised understanding of the “accounting for the data” perspective as it applies to the discipline of moral theory selection. This revised understanding is in tension with reflective equilibrium and actually provides more support for the alternative method of moral theory selection that has been termed ‘practical equilibrium’

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Ben Eggleston
University of Kansas

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References found in this work

The Right and the Good. Some Problems in Ethics.W. D. Ross - 1930 - Oxford: Clarendon Press. Edited by Philip Stratton-Lake.
The nature of morality: an introduction to ethics.Gilbert Harman - 1977 - New York: Oxford University Press.

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