Locke: A Very Short Introduction

Oxford University Press (2003)

Abstract

John Locke (1632-1704) one of the greatest English philosophers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, argued in his masterpiece, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, that our knowledge is founded in experience and reaches us principally through our senses; but its message has been curiously misunderstood. In this book John Dunn shows how Locke arrived at his theory of knowledge, and how his exposition of the liberal values of toleration and responsible government formed the backbone of enlightened European thought of the eighteenth century.

Download options

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 72,856

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
63 (#185,353)

6 months
1 (#386,040)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work

John Locke's Morality of War.Alexander Moseley - 2005 - Journal of Military Ethics 4 (2):119-128.
The Liar Paradox in Plato.Richard McDonough - 2015 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy (1):9-28.
Justice Et Tolérance. La Question du Hobbisme du Jeune Locke.Gabriela Ratuela - 2015 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 7 (1):166-186.

Add more citations