Editors’ Note

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 12 (2):vii-viii (2022)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Editors’ NoteJames M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis, and Heidi A. WalshFrom childhood, David Slakter had undergone tests and invasive procedures to monitor his nephritis. It was not a surprise when in 2015, doctors told him he needed a kidney transplant. The wife of a childhood friend was a close match and gave him one of her kidneys. Before his transplant, aerobic exercise was difficult; a few months after transplant, Slakter could ride his bike, hike, and work out with a personal trainer. He no longer had to weigh food or gauge his potassium consumption, a concern for people with kidney failure. For Slakter, “life post-transplant has been a significant improvement.”Individuals or family members of those who have received an organ transplant from a living or deceased donor share their stories in this issue of Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics. The symposium is titled “Receiving the Gift of Life: Stories from Organ Transplant Recipients.” Organ transplantation can extend an individual’s life by decades. It can also greatly improve an individual’s quality of life, as was Slakter’s experience. At the same time, organ transplantation is expensive and stressful. Recipients can experience complications, including organ rejection, and there are few appealing alternatives.After her heart transplant, author Leilani R. Graham required four open-heart surgeries, ECMO, and an intra-aortic balloon pump. She experienced delirium, necrotizing pneumonia, and severe muscular atrophy that required her to re-learn how to walk. She struggled with weight gain, explosive mood swings, hair loss, and was terrified that her body would reject the new heart. For Graham, “[Transplant] was not the miracle [she] was hoping for.” Graham says she felt unprepared for and inadequately informed about what to expect after her transplant, which left her “battered, beaten, and bruised” with a 12-inch line from neck to navel and “bullet holes” up and down her torso from the chest tubes. When reflecting on her experience post-transplant, Graham says, “It wasn’t the physical trauma that hurt the most. It was that no one seemed surprised [by the aftereffects of transplant].” Seemingly no one, that is except Graham, who calls on transplant providers to “prioritize empathy.”The symposium editors are Jason T. Eberl and Tristan McIntosh. Three commentary articles, written by Macey Leigh Levan, Heather Lannon, and Vidya A. Fleetwood, Roslyn B. Mannon & Krista L. Lentine, offer important insights into the authors’ stories. The editors thank Mid-America Transplant, the UCSF Lung Transplant Program, Donor Connect, William L. Freeman, MD, MPH, MJIL, CIP, Janet Monk, and the individuals who gave anonymous donations to support the publication of this issue, an open-access VOICES edition of the symposium, and accompanying teaching guides.The research article in this issue, “‘A Shell of My Former Self’: Using Figurative Language to Promote Communication about Patient Suffering,” was written by Tyler Tate, Elizabeth Stein, and Robert A. Pearlman. The relief of suffering is a primary goal of medicine. However, the authors note that clinicians often miss or ignore suffering because they focus on the causes rather than the experience of suffering, or the subjective nature of suffering makes it difficult to discuss. The authors believe that “the key to communicating about suffering lies in finding [End Page vii] the right kind of words to describe the experience” and say that figurative language offers a promising approach. In their research, the authors performed qualitative analysis on 52 works of literature and identified 254 excerpts of figurative language with themes of non-physical or psychological suffering. The authors found 13 salient themes: brokenness, diminishment, disorientation, drowning, emptiness, imprisonment, battle, darkness, isolation, invisibility, lifelessness, punishment, and torture. The authors reiterate that developing a shared language of suffering could foster a therapeutic patient-clinician relationship and improve clinicians’ ability to recognize and address a patient’s experience of suffering.María Susana Ciruzzi wrote the first of two case studies included in this issue. “The Sword of King Solomon” addresses a tragic and difficult subject—how to navigate the situation posed by conjoined twins when “any decision will produce damage and suffering.” The case involves two infant male patients born at 37 weeks gestation as omphalo-ischiopagus conjoined twins...

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,873

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2020 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (1):v-vii.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2017 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 7 (2):v-v.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2020 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (3):v-vi.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (1):v-v.
Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2019 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 9 (1):v-vi.
Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2017 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 7 (3):v-v.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (1):79-80.
Editors’ Note.James M. Dubois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (2):v-vi.
Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2019 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 9 (2):v-vi.
Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2022 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 12 (1):vii-ix.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2021 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 11 (3):vii-ix.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (3):v-vi.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2020 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (2):v-vi.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Susan G. DuBois - 2012 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):v-vi.
Editors' Note.James M. DuBois & Ana S. Iltis - 2011 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 1 (3):v-v.

Analytics

Added to PP
2023-01-09

Downloads
11 (#1,161,217)

6 months
7 (#485,787)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Ana S. Iltis
Wake Forest University

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references