Aristotle's conception of the spartan constitution

Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (1):21-30 (1974)
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Abstract

The old arguments concerning aristotle's empirical or factual approach to history in the "politics" and the fragments of the 158 aristotelian 'politeiai' should be supplemented or revised through fresh analyses of his treatment of limited, Specific themes. The present paper offers an analysis of aristotle's conception of the spartan constitution in the "politics" and the "lakedaimonion politeia." from this examination it is concluded that books ii, Vii, And viii of the "politics" represent a later, More empirical stage in aristotle's thinking concerning the spartan system, And books iv and v an earlier, More theoretical one. Book v and the "lakedaimonion politeia" reflect an intermediate fact-Gathering stage in his research. These several stages are particularly clear in aristotle's change from an approbative to a disapproving view of spartan institutions, Wherein the earlier view of an admirable lycurgan constitution contrasts with a later critical attitude toward the mistakes of the spartan 'nomothetes'

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Citations of this work

Spartan Wives: Liberation or Licence?Paul Cartledge - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (01):84-.
Spartan Wives: Liberation or Licence?Paul Cartledge - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (1):84-105.

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