Child Abuse: parental rights and the interests of the child

Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):183-194 (1990)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

I criticise the ‘liberal’view of the proper relationship between the family and State, namely that, although the interests of the child should be paramount, parents are entitled to rights of both privacy and autonomy which should be abrogated only when the child suffers a specifiable harm. I argue that the right to bear children is not absolute, and that it only grounds a right to rear upon an objectionable proprietarian picture of the child as owned by its producer. If natural parents have any rights to rear they derive from duties to bring their children into rational maturity where they can exercise rights for themselves. The presumption that natural parents are best suited to rear their own children should be discounted, as should the assumption that alternatives to natural parenting are unacceptably bad. I reject the suggestion that parents should be ‘licensed’but argue for a much closer monitoring of the family. Familial privacy, which such monitoring breaches, is shown to have a culturally specific and, given the facts of abuse, dubious value. In conclusion, I briefly specify the forms of monitoring I approve.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 94,593

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Child Abuse: parental rights and the interests of the child.David Archard - 1990 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):183-194.
Parents' Rights.J. T. Thornton - 1987 - Dissertation, Rice University
Fundamental interests and parental rights.Michael W. Austin - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):221-235.
The Internet, children, and privacy: the case against parental monitoring.Kay Mathiesen - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (4):263-274.
Children.David Archard - 2003 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The Oxford handbook of practical ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
How Many Parents Should There Be in a Family?Kalle Grill - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy (3):467-484.

Analytics

Added to PP
2010-08-10

Downloads
207 (#100,919)

6 months
23 (#152,996)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

David Archard
Lancaster University

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references