Spontaneous Generations 3 (1):28-34 (2009)

Abstract
Scholars looking back to the earliest stirrings of the philosophical tradition in ancient Greece have often seen a rational approach to nature cleaving itself off from an older approach, that of the mythographer. If this account were right, we would have here a major (and perhaps the ?rst major) drawing of an epistemic boundary. There are, however, mounting reasons to question this narrative that have been accumulating across several modern disciplines. This paper explores the most important challenges to the myth-to-science narrative and suggests that the different ways of framing the ancient debates have much to do with the boundaries between modern disciplines and/or academic cultures
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Reprint years 2009, 2010
DOI 10.4245/sponge.v3i1.8472
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Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity.David Sedley - 2007 - University of California Press.
Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity.David Sedley - 2007 - University of California Press.
Demystifying Mentalities.Geoffrey Ernest Richard Lloyd - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.

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