Critical Philosophy of Race 4 (1):74-94 (2016)

Authors
Michael P. Levine
University of Western Australia
Damian Cox
Bond University
Abstract
Posthumanist film and television is both a vehicle for reflection on discrimination and prejudice and a means of gratifying in fantasy deeply imbedded human impulses towards prejudice. Discrimination lies at the heart of posthuman narratives whenever the posthuman coalesces around an identifiable group in conflict with humans. We first introduce the idea of prejudice as a form of psychological defense, contrasting it with other accounts of prejudice in the philosophical literature. We then apply this notion to number of posthumanist film and television narratives. An adequate account of prejudice tells us about posthumanism in film—the significance of posthumanist thinking, speculation and fantasy. It helps account for the proliferation of television series and films about people who—being at one time dead, still dead or partially dead, or only sometimes dead, or have powers and appetites we do not have—are borderline creatures: not fully us, but still near to us.
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DOI 10.5325/critphilrace.4.1.0074
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Computing Machinery and Intelligence.Alan M. Turing - 1950 - Mind 59 (October):433-60.
The Heart of Racism.J. L. A. Garcia - 1996 - Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (1):5-46.
Philosophical Analysis and the Moral Concept of Racism.Jorge Garcia - 1999 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (5):1-32.

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