Society against societies: The possibility of transcultural criticism

Res Publica 13 (2):107-125 (2007)
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Abstract

This paper argues against particularism about social criticism of the form presented by Walzer. I contend that while limitation of the scope of criticism depends on the existence of our shared meanings, which are not shared by them, shared meaning itself depends on society. So, an account of society showing that societies are not discrete and mutually inaccessible refutes particularism. I argue for such an account. I deal with the objection that the focus of particularism is culture, not society, and conclude that the conditions of possibility of shared meaning have anti-particularist consequences

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Sam Clark
Lancaster University

References found in this work

Spherical justice and global injustice.Brian Barry - 1995 - In David Miller & Michael Walzer (eds.), Pluralism, Justice, and Equality. Oxford University Press. pp. 74.

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