Bonding Brains to Machines: Ethical Implications of Electroceuticals for the Human Brain

Neuroethics 6 (3):429-434 (2013)
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Abstract

Novel neurotechnologies like deep brain stimulation and brain-computer interfaces promise clinical benefits for severely suffering patients. Nevertheless, such electroceuticals raise several ethical issues on different levels: while on the level of clinical neuroethics issues with direct relevance for diagnosis and treatment have to be discussed, on the level of research neuroethics questions regarding research and development of these technological devices like investigating new targets and different diseases as well as thorough inclusion criteria are dealt with. On the level of theoretical neuroethics more general questions are examined including anthropological considerations on “normal” human functioning as well as implications on personality, personal identity and authenticity. This paper presents a brief review on ethical issues of deep brain stimulation and brain computer interfacing and simultaneously introduces to this themed issue with thirteen contributions dealing from different perspectives with ethical implications of electroceuticals for the human brain

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Citations of this work

Locked Out.Veronica Johansson, Surjo R. Soekadar & Jens Clausen - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (4):555-576.
Brain-brain integration in 2035: metaphysical and ethical implications.Soraj Hongladarom - 2015 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 13 (3/4):205-217.

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