Factors Predicting the Intent to Engage in Arguments in Close Relationships: A Revised Model

Argumentation 31 (1):121-163 (2017)
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Abstract

This manuscript examines argument engagement in close relationships. Two pilot studies were conducted to identify what factors naïve actors report matter to them when considering whether to engage in an interpersonal argument, and to develop and pre-test measurement scales for these factors. The main study examined which of these factors predicted participants’ behavioral intent to engage in an argument about different topics and with different partners. Results indicated intent to engage was predicted by five factors: one’s orientation to the topic, one’s preparedness for an argument, the costs of arguing, the effort involved in arguing, and one’s right to speak one’s mind. Several of these factors are new contributions to argument engagement research. A discussion of these results and their implications are presented.

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References found in this work

Two concepts of argument.Daniel J. O'Keefe - 1992 - In William L. Benoit, Dale Hample & Pamela J. Benoit (eds.), Readings in Argumentation. Foris Publications. pp. 11--79.
The Rhetorical Situation.Lloyd F. Bitzer - 1992 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 25 (1):1 - 14.
Where is argument.Wayne Brockriede - 1992 - In William L. Benoit, Dale Hample & Pamela J. Benoit (eds.), Readings in Argumentation. Foris Publications. pp. 73--78.

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