Euthyphro’s "Dilemma", Socrates’ Daimonion and Plato’s God

European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (1):39 - 64 (2010)
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Abstract

In this paper I start with the familiar accusation that divine command ethics faces a "Euthyphro dilemma". By looking at what Plato’s ’Euthyphro’ actually says, I argue that no such argument against divine-command ethics was Plato’s intention, and that, in any case, no such argument is cogent. I then explore the place of divine commands and inspiration in Plato’s thought more generally, arguing that Plato sees an important epistemic and practical role for both.

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Sophie Grace Chappell
Open University (UK)

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