You Deserve to Suffer for What You Did

Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (4):771-782 (2018)
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Abstract

On many philosophical accounts, the emotion of anger includes a belief that we have been wrongly injured by someone, deliberately or from a lack of due regard. It includes also the belief that the person who injured us deserves to suffer for what she did. Her suffering would serve as fair payback for the suffering she caused us. In slightly different terms, anger includes a desire to strike back at someone who has injured us because we believe that hurting her will compensate for our hurt. A key ethical question concerning anger is whether indulging a desire for retribution or payback is worthy of us as persons.

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Conceiving Emotions: Martha Nussbaum's Upheavals of Thought.Diana Fritz Cates - 2003 - Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):325-341.

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