Women on Liberty in Early Modern England

Philosophy Compass 9 (2):112-122 (2014)
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Abstract

Our modern ideals about liberty were forged in the great political and philosophical debates of the 17th and 18th centuries, but we seldom hear about women's contributions to those debates. This paper examines the ideas of early modern English women – namely Margaret Cavendish, Mary Astell, Mary Overton, ‘Eugenia’, Sarah Chapone and the civil war women petitioners – with respect to the classic political concepts of negative, positive and republican liberty. The author suggests that these writers' woman-centred concerns provide a unique historical perspective on these much-discussed ideals of freedom from external interference, freedom as self-determination and freedom from domination.

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Author's Profile

Jacqueline Broad
Monash University

References found in this work

Leviathan.Thomas Hobbes - 2006 - In Aloysius Martinich, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Early Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
Liberty before Liberalism.Quentin Skinner - 2001 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (1):172-175.
Autonomy, Gender, Politics.Marilyn Friedman - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
Negative and positive freedom.Gerald C. MacCallum - 1967 - Philosophical Review 76 (3):312-334.

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