Augustine, epicurus, and external world skepticism

Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):157-168 (2006)
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Abstract

: In Contra Academicos 3.11.24, Augustine responds to skepticism about the existence of the external world by arguing that what appears to be the world — as he terms things, the "quasi-earth" and "quasi-sky" — cannot be doubted. While some (e.g., M. Burnyeat and G. Matthews) interpret this passage as a subjectivist response to global skepticism, it is here argued that Augustine's debt to Epicurean epistemology and theology, especially as presented in Cicero's De Natura Deorum 1.25.69 - 1.26.74, provides the basis for a much more plausible, realist interpretation of Augustine's argument

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Charles Bolyard
James Madison University

Citations of this work

The legend of the justified true belief analysis.Julien Dutant - 2015 - Philosophical Perspectives 29 (1):95-145.
Augustine's Defence of Knowledge against the Sceptics.Tamer Nawar - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:215-265.
Medieval skepticism.Charles Bolyard - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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