Authors
Samuel Kerstein
University of Maryland, College Park
Greg Bognar
Stockholm University
Abstract
In the distribution of resources, persons must be respected, or so many philosophers contend. Unfortunately, they often leave it unclear why a certain allocation would respect persons, while another would not. In this paper, we explore what it means to respect persons in the distribution of scarce, life-saving resources. We begin by presenting two kinds of cases. In different age cases, we have a drug that we must use either to save a young person who would live for many more years or an old person who would only live for a few. In different numbers cases, we must save either one person or many persons from certain death. We argue that two familiar accounts of respect for persons―an equal worth account, suggested by Jeff McMahan, and a Kantian account, inspired by the Formula of Humanity―have implausible implications in such cases. We develop a new, “three-tiered” account: one that, we claim, generates results in such cases that accord better with many people’s considered judgments than those produced by its rivals
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Reprint years 2011
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DOI 10.26556/jesp.v5i2.51
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References found in this work BETA

Treating Others Merely as Means.Samuel Kerstein - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2):163-180.
Complete Lives in the Balance.Samuel J. Kerstein & Greg Bognar - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):37 – 45.

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Citations of this work BETA

Complete Lives in the Balance.Samuel J. Kerstein & Greg Bognar - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):37 – 45.
Three Crucial Turns on the Road to an Adequate Understanding of Human Dignity.Ralf Stoecker - 2010 - In Paulus Kaufmann, Hannes Kuch, Christian Neuhäuser & Elaine Webster (eds.), Humiliation, Degradation, Dehumanization. Human Dignity Violated. Dordrecht, Niederlande: Springer. pp. 7-17.

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