Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):371-386 (2015)

Abstract
Modern Western medical individualism has had a significant impact on health care in China. This essay demonstrates the ways in which such Western-style individualism has been explicitly endorsed in China’s 2010 directive: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. The Norms require that the patient himself, rather than a member of his family, sign each informed consent form. This change in clinical practice indicates a shift toward medical individualism in Chinese healthcare legislation. Such individualism, however, is incompatible with the character of Chinese familism that is deeply rooted in the Chinese ethical tradition. It also contradicts family-based patterns of health care in China. Moreover, the requirement for individual informed consent is incompatible with numerous medical regulations promulgated in the past two decades. This essay argues that while Chinese medical legislation should learn from relevant Western ideas, it should not simply copy such practices by importing medical individualism into Chinese health care. Chinese healthcare policy is properly based on Chinese medical familist resources
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DOI 10.1093/jmp/jhv016
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References found in this work BETA

The Foundations of Bioethics.H. Tristram Engelhardt - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
Informed Consent in Texas: Theory and Practice.Mark J. Cherry & H. Tristram Engelhardt - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):237 – 252.
Parents, Adolescents, and Consent for Research Participation.A. S. Iltis - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):332-346.

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Citations of this work BETA

Lost in ‘Culturation’: Medical Informed Consent in China.Vera Lúcia Raposo - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (1):17-30.
Building Norms for Organ Donation in China: Pitfalls and Challenges.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):640-662.
Informed Consent: The Decisional Standing of Families.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):363-370.
Dignity, Health, and Membership: Who Counts as One of Us?Bryan C. Pilkington - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (2):115-129.
Truth, Progress, and Regress in Bioethics.Victor Saenz - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (6):615-633.

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