Abstract
In recent years, there have been reports about increased religious discrimination in schools. As a way of acknowledging the importance of religion and faith communities in the public sphere and to propose a solution to the exclusion of religious citizens, the political philosopher Jürgen Habermas suggests an act of translation for which both secular and religious citizens are mutually responsible. What gets lost in Habermas's translation, this paper argues, is the condition that makes translation both necessary and possible. Drawing on Walter Benjamin's notion of the mysterious untranslatable and the task of the translator, the paper approaches translation as an ethical process involving risk, asymmetry and uncertainty. Not knowing where this risk will lead, the paper takes the ethical ambivalence at play in Jacques Derrida's notion of the untranslatable and explores this in relation to religious difference in education. It argues that the untranslatable needs to be acknowledged in terms of a respect for difference and a limit to narration, if students with religious convictions are not to be further violated in schools.
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DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9752.2009.00662.x
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References found in this work BETA

Giving an Account of Oneself.Judith Butler - 2005 - Fordham University Press.
Religion in the Public Sphere.Jurgen Habermas - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):1–25.

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Citations of this work BETA

On Seizing the Source: Toward a Phenomenology of Religious Violence.Michael Staudigl - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (5):744-782.
Living in a Dissonant World: Toward an Agonistic Cosmopolitics for Education.Sharon Todd - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (2):213-228.
Ourselves in Translation: Stanley Cavell and Philosophy as Autobiography.Naoko Saito - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (2):253-267.
Distance and Defamiliarisation: Translation as Philosophical Method.Claudia W. Ruitenberg - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):421-435.
Habermas and the Aporia of Translating Religion in Democracy.Badredine Arfi - 2015 - European Journal of Social Theory 18 (4):489-506.

View all 12 citations / Add more citations

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