Philosophy Today 65 (3):727-745 (2021)

Authors
Michael James Bennett
University of King's College
Abstract
This article responds to several liberal bioethicists’ criticisms of Jürgen Habermas’s The Future of Human Nature by placing it in the context of his intellectual influences and career-spanning theorization of communicative rationality. In particular, I argue that Habermas’s critics have not grasped his interpretation of Hannah Arendt’s concept of natality. Far from merely ventriloquizing his friend and teacher, Habermas distinguishes his construal of that concept from Arendt’s, which he presents as a naturalistic foil to his concerns about the potential ethical impact of preimplantation genetic interventions. Whereas, according to Habermas, Arendt reasons directly from the biological fact of birth to the capacity for political action, he himself construes natality as implying a “divide between nature and culture” at the level of the “lifeworld.” Identifying Habermas’s interpretation of Arendt in this way explains why Habermas claims not to be a biological determinist and why the bioethicists’ criticism, according to which he is, fails.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.5840/philtoday2021524416
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 65,657
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Hannah Arendt and the Political Imagination.Wayne Allen - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):349-369.
What is the Aim of Discussion? A Provisional Answer with the Help of Habermas and Arendt.Veronica Vasterling - 2016 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 18 (1):147402221662912.
The Future of Human Nature.Jurgen Habermas - 2004 - Philosophy 79 (309):483-486.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2021-05-28

Total views
13 ( #753,463 of 2,462,340 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
9 ( #78,547 of 2,462,340 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes