Our shared species-typical evolutionary psychology

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):148-148 (2000)
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Abstract

Because human cultures are far more similar than they are different, culturally constituted niches may work to limit or prevent the development of genetically based psychological differences across populations. The niche approach further implies that we may remain relatively well-adapted to contemporary environments because of the latter's cultural niche continuity with ancient environments.

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