Authors
Alison Bailey
Illinois State University
Abstract
Abstract: If anger is the emotion of injustice, and if most injustices have prominent epistemic dimensions, then where is the anger in epistemic injustice? Despite the question my task is not to account for the lack of attention to anger in epistemic injustice discussions. Instead, I argue that a particular texture of transformative anger – a knowing resistant anger – offers marginalized knowers a powerful resource for countering epistemic injustice. I begin by making visible the anger that saturates the silences that epistemic injustices repeatedly manufacture and explain the obvious: silencing practices produce angry experiences. I focus on tone policing and tone vigilance to illustrate the relationship between silencing and angry knowledge management. Next, I use María Lugones’s pluralist account of anger to bring out the epistemic dimensions of knowing resistant anger in a way that also calls attention to their histories and felt textures. The final section draws on feminist scholarship about the transformative power of angry knowledge to suggest how it might serve as a resource for resisting epistemic injustice.
Keywords Epistemic Injustice  Transformative Anger  Tone Policing  Testimonial Injustice
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Reprint years 2018
DOI 10.1017/S1358246118000565
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References found in this work BETA

Love and Knowledge: Emotion in Feminist Epistemology.Alison M. Jaggar - 1989 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):151 – 176.
Epistemic Injustice.Rachel McKinnon - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):437-446.

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Citations of this work BETA

Outrage and the Bounds of Empathy.Sukaina Hirji - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
Harms and Wrongs in Epistemic Practice.Simon Barker, Charlie Crerar & Trystan S. Goetze - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:1-21.
Emotions and Distrust in Science.Katherine Furman - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (5):713-730.
Decolonising Knowledge Here and Now.Veli Mitova - 2020 - Philosophical Papers 49 (2):191-212.
Political Anger.Myisha Cherry - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (2):e12811.

View all 9 citations / Add more citations

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