Consciousness: Mapping the theoretical landscape

Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (10):372-382 (2000)

Abstract

What makes us conscious? Many theories that attempt to answer this question have appeared recently in the context of widespread interest about consciousness in the cognitive neurosciences. Most of these proposals are formulated in terms of the information processing conducted by the brain. In this overview, we survey and contrast these models. We first delineate several notions of consciousness, addressing what it is that the various models are attempting to explain. Next, we describe a conceptual landscape that addresses how the theories attempt to explain consciousness. We then situate each of several representative models in this landscape and indicate which aspect of consciousness they try to explain. We conclude that the search for the neural correlates of consciousness should be usefully complemented by a search for the computational correlates of consciousness.

Download options

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 72,855

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
279 (#40,026)

6 months
1 (#386,031)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Michael L. Thomas
University of Chicago

Similar books and articles

How Can We Construct a Science of Consciousness?David J. Chalmers - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press. pp. 1111--1119.
Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness: A Review Article. [REVIEW]Bill Faw - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):69-72.