Are Lawyers Liars?: The Argument of Redescription: Arthur Isak Applbaum

Legal Theory 4 (1):63-91 (1998)
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Abstract

In “Professional Detachment: The Executioner of Paris,” I concluded with the cheap and some would say libelous suggestion that lawyers might accurately be described as serial liars, because they repeatedly try to induce others to believe in the truth of propositions or in the validity of arguments that they believe to be false. Good lawyers have responded with some indignation that, in calling zealous advocacy “lying,” I have misdescribed the practice of law. I wish to explain why I believe that it is the practice of lawyering that engages in misdescription.

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Citations of this work

Representing Falsehoods.Robert E. Goodin - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy 50 (4):495-512.
Editorial.Kim Economides & Julian Webb - 1998 - Legal Ethics 1 (2):101-107.

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References found in this work

Two Concepts of Rules.John Rawls - 1955 - Philosophical Review 64 (1):3-32.
Consciousness, Explanatory Inversion and Cognitive Science.John R. Searle - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):189-189.
Consciousness, Attention and the Connection Principle.John R. Searle - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):198-203.

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