Did Hayek commit the naturalistic fallacy?

Abstract

In promoting spontaneous orders – orders that evolve in a process of cultural evolution – as “efficient,” “beneficial,” and “advantageous,” Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) has often been attributed the belief that there is something desirable about them. For this reason, he has been accused of committing the naturalistic fallacy, that is, of trying to derive an “ought” from an “is.” It appears that Hayek was..

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 91,102

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

  • Only published works are available at libraries.

Similar books and articles

Hayek and Departure from Praxeology.Jakub Wozinski - 2010 - Libertarian Papers 2:24.
Spontaneous order: Michael Polanyi and Friedrich Hayek.Struan Jacobs - 2000 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (4):49-67.
The history of Hayek's theory of cultural evolution.E. Angner - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (4):695-718.
Was Hayek an instrumentalist? [REVIEW]Ryszard Legutko - 1997 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 11 (1):145-164.
The Naturalistic Fallacy.Julia Tanner - 2006 - Richmond Journal of Philosophy 13.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
796 (#18,060)

6 months
2 (#889,309)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Erik Angner
Stockholm University

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references