Journal of the History of Biology 49 (2):241-259 (2016)

Abstract
The interest of F. Macfarlane Burnet in host–parasite interactions grew through the 1920s and 1930s, culminating in his book, Biological Aspects of Infectious Disease, often regarded as the founding text of disease ecology. Our knowledge of the influences on Burnet’s ecological thinking is still incomplete. Burnet later attributed much of his conceptual development to his reading of British theoretical biology, especially the work of Julian Huxley and Charles Elton, and regretted he did not study Theobald Smith’s Parasitism and Disease until after he had formulated his ideas. Scholars also have adduced Burnet’s fascination with natural history and the clinical and public health demands on his research effort, among other influences. I want to consider here additional contributions to Burnet’s ecological thinking, focusing on his intellectual milieu, placing his research in a settler society with exceptional expertise in environmental studies and pest management. In part, an ‘‘ecological turn’’ in Australian science in the 1930s, derived to a degree from British colonial scientific investments, shaped Burnet’s conceptual development. This raises the question of whether we might characterize, in postcolonial fashion, disease ecology, and other studies of parasitism, as successful settler colonial or dominion science.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1007/s10739-015-9407-6
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 69,066
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Evolution. — The Modern Synthesis.J. Huxley & T. H. Huxley - 1950 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 6 (2):207-207.
The Science of Life.H. G. Wells, Julian Huxley & G. P. Wells - 1931 - Philosophy 6 (24):506-507.

View all 16 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Nowhere to run, rabbit: the cold-war calculus of disease ecology.Warwick Anderson - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (2):13.
René Dubos, Tuberculosis, and the “Ecological Facets of Virulence”.Mark Honigsbaum - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (3):15.

View all 6 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Nowhere to run, rabbit: the cold-war calculus of disease ecology.Warwick Anderson - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (2):13.
René Dubos, Tuberculosis, and the “Ecological Facets of Virulence”.Mark Honigsbaum - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (3):15.
The Bacteriophage, its Role in Immunology: How Macfarlane Burnet’s Phage Research Shaped His Scientific Style.Neeraja Sankaran - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):367-375.
Notes Towards a Semiotics of Parasitism.Han-Liang Chang - 2003 - Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):421-438.
Towards a Model of Host-Parasite Relationships.L. Dujardin & E. Dei-cas - 1999 - Acta Biotheoretica 47 (3-4):253-266.
Population Cycles, Disease, and Networks of Ecological Knowledge.Susan Jones - 2017 - Journal of the History of Biology 50 (2):357-391.
Seeing the Forest for the Trees. [REVIEW]Anya Plutynski - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):299-303.
Collations of Platonis W.W. L. Lorimer - 1950 - Classical Quarterly 44 (3-4):106-.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2019-01-25

Total views
7 ( #1,063,755 of 2,498,786 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #421,542 of 2,498,786 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes