Marion and Derrida on the Gift and Desire: Debating the Generosity of Things

Springer Verlag (2016)
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Abstract

This chapter seeks clarification into how Marion understands “desire,” especially in The Erotic Phenomenon. Philosophies of “objectivity” have lost sight of love and its uniquely supporting evidences, and desire plays a number of roles in restoring to love the “dignity of a concept,” in its contribution to forming selfhood and “individualization,” and in its establishing the paradoxical bases of the erotic reduction and “eroticization.” Since he claims in La Rigueur des Choses that “The Erotic Phenomenon logically completes the phenomenology of the gift and the saturated phenomenon,” it is necessary to conceive of how and to what degree. The erotic reduction demands that one bracket oneself and return to the Ursprung of intuition by asking the important question “can I be the first to love?” This chapter initiates an application of these findings on the manifold of desire back onto Marion’s understanding of “the gift” and his phenomenology of givenness. How might the erotic reduction and the reduction to givenness interrelate? Might love and desire be modes or “capacities” of alteration of one’s experience within intuition? Desire, which is conceived in relation to “lack” as a resource, provides a kind of “negative assurance” that allows the adonné to access an affirmation of love.

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Chapters

Marion’s The Adonné or “The Given:” Between Passion and Passivity

This chapter investigates how Marion’s theory of the adonné can circumvent the problematic distinctions between activity and passivity. Some of the major concerns for Marion’s approach is that the adonné – or “the given” – becomes a passionless receiver, especially since Marion discards the modern s... see more

Four Tensions Between Marion and Derrida: Very Close and Extremely Distant

This chapter takes many of the findings from previous chapters concerning Marion and Derrida’s respective positions on the gift and desire, and demonstrates the stark differences between the two thinkers according to four aspects: anti-subjectivity/the adonné, possibility/impossibility, the gift/giv... see more

Marion on Love and Givenness: Desiring to Give What One Lacks

This chapter extends the treatment of Marion’s The Erotic Phenomenon and applies the findings on the “manifold of desire” from chapter three to an investigation into how that manifold might specifically relate with “the gift.” The topic of privation is used as one way to exfoliate the points of inte... see more

Desire in Derrida’s Given Time: There is (Es gibt) No Gift Outside the Text

The Gift in Derrida’s Deconstruction: Affirming the Gift Through Denegation

If the gift in fact is central to deconstruction, then it is at work even when Derrida doesn’t write explicitly about it. This chapter turns to Derrida’s essay “How to Avoid Speaking: Denials,” and demonstrates how within it the gift can be contextualized in his deconstruction more generally. The gi... see more

Introduction: Histories of the Gift and Desire

This chapter provides a brief historical backdrop to both topics of “the gift” and “desire” especially in French philosophy in the twentieth century, and initiates an engagement on thinking how the two topics can be thought simultaneously in order to ultimately shed further light on the distinctions... see more

Conclusion: The Generosity of Things: Between Phenomenology and Deconstruction

This chapter synthesizes findings from previous sections on Derrida and Marion’s differing conclusions on the gift and desire, then contextualizes those differences within the two thinker’s respective positions of deconstruction and phenomenology. The consequences of these distinctions bear weight o... see more

Indifference: Derrida Beyond Husserl, Intentionality, and Desire

This chapter exclusively focuses on the ways in which Derrida conceives of the insufficiencies of Husserlian phenomenology, especially “intentionality” as it might relate with desire. Since Derrida calls for an “impossible” relation with the future “to-come” that is out of the reach of “my will or d... see more

The Manifolds of Desire and Love in Marion’s The Erotic Phenomenon

Desire in Derrida’s Given Time: There is No Gift Outside the Text

This chapter takes the findings from chapter seven on Derrida’s rejection of intentionality and desire from having a role in deconstruction and applies them to an interpretation of how he understands the gift in his ambiguously titled Given Time . Given Time does not simply unfold how time is given,... see more

The Manifolds of Desire and Love in Marion’s The Erotic Phenomenon

This chapter seeks clarification into how Marion understands “desire,” especially in The Erotic Phenomenon. Philosophies of “objectivity” have lost sight of love and its uniquely supporting evidences, and desire plays a number of roles in restoring to love the “dignity of a concept,” in its contribu... see more

Similar books and articles

The Erotic Phenomenon.Jean-Luc Marion - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
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The Limits of Marion’s and Derrida’s Philosophy of the Gift.Antonio Malo - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):149-168.
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Jason Alvis
University of Vienna

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