Pretending to see

Philosophical Psychology 19 (6):713-728 (2006)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

There are three distinct projects - ontological, phenomenological, and conceptual - to pursue in the philosophy of perception. They are, however, rarely distinguished. Failure to distinguish them has resulted in their being pursued as one. Their completion then requires that they admit of the same solution, while accommodating the existence of misperception and the scientific facts concerning the perceptual process. The lesson to learn from misperceptions and those facts is, however, that no such common solution is possible, and that the projects must, and can, be pursued separately. Pursuit of the phenomenological and conceptual projects then requires a context in which discourse concerning objects of perception is permitted without ontological commitment to such objects. This is supplied by treating certain uses of perceptual locutions as within a context of pretense

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 89,685

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Imagining and pretending.Alan R. White - 1988 - Philosophical Investigations 11 (October):300-314.
The phenomenal character of experience.Sydney Shoemaker - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):291-314.
Nonconceptual demonstrative reference.Athanassius Raftopoulos & Vincent Muller - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (2):251-285.
Perception and belief.A. D. Smith - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):283-309.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
66 (#219,893)

6 months
2 (#648,997)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Marc Alspector-Kelly
Western Michigan University

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

Theory of knowledge.Roderick M. Chisholm - 1966 - Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,: Prentice-Hall.
Patterns of discovery.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1958 - Cambridge [Eng.]: University Press.
Sense and Sensibilia.John Langshaw Austin - 1962 - Oxford University Press.
Consciousness, Color, and Content.Michael Tye - 2000 - Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

View all 34 references / Add more references