Character, self, and sociability in the Scottish Enlightenment

New York: Palgrave-Macmillan (2011)
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Abstract

This book is about Enlightenment ideas of "character." It argues for their central importance in eighteenth-century thought and culture. The scope of this volume extends well beyond the confines of literary history. It examines discussions of race, nation, the self, virtue, sociability, and historical progress. The specially commissioned essays in this volume are the first, collectively, to address the broader significance of Enlightenment "character," and to do so from an interdisciplinary perspective. The focus is on the Scottish Enlightenment, but contributors consider these debates in their international contexts and in relation to parallel developments in Britain, Europe, and America.

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Scottish Philosophy in the 18th Century.Alexander Broadie - 2001 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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