Switch to: References

Citations of:

Law, Economics, and Morality

Oup Usa (2010)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Moral Asymmetries and Economic Evaluations of Climate Change: The Challenge of Assessing Diverse Effects.Blake Francis - 2017 - In Duncan Purves, Säde Hormio & Adrian Walsh (eds.), The Ethical Underpinnings of Climate Economics. New York: pp. 141-162.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • New Directions in Legal Scholarship: Implications for Business Ethics Research, Theory, and Practice.John Hasnas, Robert Prentice & Alan Strudler - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):503-531.
    Legal scholars and business ethicists are interested in many of the same core issues regarding human and firm behavior. The vast amount of legal research being generated by nearly 10,000 law school and business law scholars will inevitably influence business ethics research. This paper describes some of the recent trends in legal scholarship and explores its implications for three significant aspects of business ethics research—methodology, theory, and policy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Making Sense of Discrimination.Re'em Segev - 2014 - Ratio Juris 27 (1):47-78.
    Discrimination is a central moral and legal concept. However, it is also a contested one. Particularly, accounts of the wrongness of discrimination often rely on controversial and particular assumptions. In this paper, I argue that a theory of discrimination that relies on premises that are very general and widely accepted provides a plausible account of the concept of wrongful discrimination. According to the combined theory, wrongful discrimination consists of allocating a benefit that is not supported by a morally significant fact, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Measuring Freedom, and its Value.Nicolas Cote - 2021 - Dissertation, London School of Economics
    This thesis concerns the measurement of freedom, and its value. Specifically, I am concerned with three overarching questions. First, can we measure the extent of an individual’s freedom? It had better be that we can, otherwise much ordinary and intuitive talk that we would like to vindicate – say, about free persons being freer than slaves – will turn out to be false or meaningless. Second, in what ways is freedom valuable, and how is this value measured? It matters, for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Thresholds and Limits in Theories of Distributive Justice.Dick Timmer - 2021 - Dissertation, Utrecht University
    Despite the prominence of thresholds and limits in theories of distributive justice, there is no general account of their role within such theories. This has allowed an ongoing lack of clarity and misunderstanding around threshold views in distributive justice. In this thesis, I develop an account of the conceptual structure of such views. Such an account helps understand and characterize threshold views, can subsume what may seem to be different debates about such views under one conceptual header, and can be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis and Non-Utilitarian Ethics.Rosemary Lowry & Martin Peterson - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):1470594-11416767.
    Cost-benefit analysis is commonly understood to be intimately connected with utilitarianism and incompatible with other moral theories, particularly those that focus on deontological concepts such as rights. We reject this claim and argue that cost-benefit analysis can take moral rights as well as other non-utilitarian moral considerations into account in a systematic manner. We discuss three ways of doing this, and claim that two of them (output filters and input filters) can account for a wide range of rights-based moral theories, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Mental Time-Travel, Semantic Flexibility, and A.I. Ethics.Marcus Arvan - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-20.
    This article argues that existing approaches to programming ethical AI fail to resolve a serious moral-semantic trilemma, generating interpretations of ethical requirements that are either too semantically strict, too semantically flexible, or overly unpredictable. This paper then illustrates the trilemma utilizing a recently proposed ‘general ethical dilemma analyzer,’ GenEth. Finally, it uses empirical evidence to argue that human beings resolve the semantic trilemma using general cognitive and motivational processes involving ‘mental time-travel,’ whereby we simulate different possible pasts and futures. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Implicit Morality of the Market and Joseph Heath’s Market Failures Approach to Business Ethics.Marc A. Cohen & Dean Peterson - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics (1):1-14.
    Joseph Heath defends competitive markets and conceptualizes business ethics with reference to Pareto efficiency, which he takes to be the “implicit morality of the market.” His justification for markets is that they generate Pareto efficient outcomes, meaning that markets optimally satisfy consumer preferences. And, for Heath, business ethics is the set of normative constraints—regulation and beyond-compliance norms—needed to preserve that outcome. The present paper accepts Heath’s claim that the economic justification for markets is ethical, in that satisfying consumer preferences is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Doing, Allowing, and the State.Adam Omar Hosein - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (2):235-264.
    The doing/allowing distinction plays an important role in our thinking about a number of legal issues, such as the need for criminal process protections, prohibitions on torture, the permissibility of the death penalty and so on. These are areas where, at least initially, there seem to be distinctions between harms that the state inflicts and harms that it merely allows. In this paper I will argue for the importance of the doing/allowing distinction as applied to state action. Sunstein, Holmes, Vermeule (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations