Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Publicity as Covert Marketing? The Role of Persuasion Knowledge and Ethical Perceptions on Beliefs and Credibility in a Video News Release Story.Michelle R. Nelson & Jiwoo Park - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):327-341.
    Publicity may be considered “covert marketing” when the audience believes the message was created by an independent source rather than the product marketer. We focus on one form of publicity—video news releases —which are packaged video segments created and provided for free by a third party to the news organization. VNRs are usually shown without source disclosure. In study one, viewers’ beliefs about and perceptions of credibility in a news story are altered when they acquire persuasion knowledge about VNRs and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Increased Persuasion Knowledge of Video News Releases: Audience Beliefs About News and Support for Source Disclosure.Hye-Jin Paek, Michelle L. M. Wood & Michelle R. Nelson - 2009 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (4):220-237.
    Video news releases (VNRs) have been criticized when they are used within a newscast without source disclosure because they violate ethical codes related to transparency and consumers' “right to be informed” by whom they are being persuaded. In an experiment, we show how increased persuasion knowledge about VNRs is positively related to beliefs in news commercialization, beliefs in VNR inappropriateness without disclosure, and support for disclosure of VNR material. We suggest that increased knowledge about VNRs without source disclosure measures might (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Tragedies of the Broadcast Commons: Consumer Perspectives on the Ethics of Product Placement and Video News Releases.Jay Newell, Jeffrey Layne Blevins & Michael Bugeja - 2009 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (4):201-219.
    This article explores cynicism as an ethical issue associated with the blurring of content and advertising in mass media. From a communitarian perspective and adapting Hardin's (1968) metaphorical use of “commons” to the domain of broadcasting, we surveyed the attitudes of individuals toward two phenomena of media saturation (product placement and video news releases) and three constructs (cynicism directed toward government, cynicism directed toward marketers, and the individual's assessment of their marketing literacy). Respondents were highly cynical about government regulation of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Visual Evidence in Environmental Catastrophe Tv Stories.Conrad Smith - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (4):247 – 257.
    Examination of visual images in evening network television stories about 5 environmental catastrophes indicates that news producers usually ignored their own network's policies about identifying news footage from advocacy groups and almost always ignored their own network's policies about labeling file hotage. In some unlabeled footage was used in symbolic ways that would not substantially mislead viewers. In other cases, unlabeled video suggested the persistence of a catastrophic reality that had not existed for as long as 4 years.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Not Biting the Hand That Feeds Them: Hegemonic Expediency in the Newsroom and the Karen Ryan/Health and Human Services Department Video News Release.Burton St John - 2008 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (2):110-125.
    This study examines the use of a video news release in a specific story. Press coverage and editorial criticism in the case showed that journalists do not articulate sufficiently how the news owners' sway, through institutional controls, can lead to a hegemony of expedient action in the newsroom. Critical self-reflection by news workers will better enable journalists to ethically deliberate news choices that balance their responsibilities to owners, peers, and the public.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations