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Frege: Tradition & Influence

Blackwell (1984)

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  1. Thoughts Without Objects.Fred Adams, Gary Fullerd & Robert Stecker - 1993 - Mind and Language 8 (1):90-104.
  • Descripciones definidas, demostrativos y sus usos.Maite Ezcurdia - 2002 - Dianoia 47 (48):3-23.
    Al responder al reto que Donnellan les presenta a los russellianos de explicar los usos referenciales de las descripciones definidas, éstos recurren a la distinción entre el significado del hablante y el significado semántico. Suponiendo que, a diferencia de las descripciones definidas, los demostrativos sólo pueden usarse referencialmente, defiendo la idea de que aun en estos casos se puede distinguir el significado del hablante del significado semántico. Explico cómo puede establecerse la distinción en el caso de los demostrativos complejos y (...)
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  • The Julio César Problem.Fraser MacBride - 2005 - Dialectica 59 (2):223–236.
    One version of the Julius Caesar problem arises when we demand assurance that expressions drawn from different theories or stretches of discourse refer to different things. The counter‐Caesar problem arises when assurance is demanded that expressions drawn from different theories . refer to the same thing. The Julio César problem generalises from the counter‐Caesar problem. It arises when we seek reassurance that expressions drawn from different languages refer to the same kind of things . If the Julio César problem is (...)
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  • The Meaning of Illness in Nursing Practice: A Philosophical Model of Communication and Concept Possession.Halvor Nordby - 2016 - Nursing Philosophy 17 (2):103-118.
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  • In Defense of Absolute Essentialism.Graeme Forbes - 1986 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):3-31.
  • Abstract Objects.Gideon Rosen - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • The Philosophy of Computer Science.Raymond Turner - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Platonism in the Philosophy of Mathematics.Øystein Linnebo - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Platonism about mathematics (or mathematical platonism) isthe metaphysical view that there are abstract mathematical objectswhose existence is independent of us and our language, thought, andpractices. Just as electrons and planets exist independently of us, sodo numbers and sets. And just as statements about electrons and planetsare made true or false by the objects with which they are concerned andthese objects' perfectly objective properties, so are statements aboutnumbers and sets. Mathematical truths are therefore discovered, notinvented., Existence. There are mathematical objects.
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  • Principia Mathematica.A. D. Irvine - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Sortals.Richard E. Grandy - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Categories.Amie Thomasson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A system of categories is a complete list of highest kinds or genera. Traditionally, following Aristotle, these have been thought of as highest genera of entities (in the widest sense of the term), so that a system of categories undertaken in this realist spirit would ideally provide an inventory of everything there is, thus answering the most basic of metaphysical questions: “What is there?”. Skepticism about the possibilities for discerning the different categories of ‘reality itself’ has led others to approach (...)
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  • Logicism and Neologicism.Neil Tennant - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.