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Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction

Oxford University Press (1996)

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  1. What is a Death with Dignity?Jyl Gentzler - 2003 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (4):461 – 487.
    Proponents of the legalization of assisted suicide often appeal to our supposed right to "die with dignity" to defend their case. I examine and assess different notions of "dignity" that are operating in many arguments for the legalization of assisted suicide, and I find them all to be deficient. I then consider an alternative conception of dignity that is based on Aristotle's conception of the conditions on the best life. I conclude that, while such a conception of dignity fits best (...)
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  • Exploring a Moral Landscape: Genetic Science and Ethics.Barbara Nicholas - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (1):45-63.
    : This project draws on scholarship of feminist and womanist scholars, and on results of interviews with scientists currently involved in molecular genetics. With reference to Margaret Urban Walker's "practices of moral responsibility," the social practices of molecular geneticists are explored, and strategies identified through which scientists negotiate their moral responsibilities. The implications of this work for scientists and for feminists are discussed.
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  • “Fatal Practices”: A Feminist Analysis of Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.Diane Raymond - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):1-25.
    In this essay, I examine the arguments against physician-assisted suicide Susan Wolf offers in her essay, “Gender, Feminism, and Death: Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.” I argue that Wolf's analysis of PAS, while timely and instructive in many ways, does not require that feminists reject policy approaches that might permit PAS. The essay concludes with reflections on the relationship between feminism and questions of agency, especially women's agency.
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  • “Fatal Practices”: A Feminist Analysis of Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.Diane Raymond - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):1-25.
    : In this essay, I examine the arguments against physician - assisted suicide Susan Wolf offers in her essay, "Gender, Feminism, and Death : Physician - Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia." I argue that Wolf's analysis of PAS, while timely and instructive in many ways, does not require that feminists reject policy approaches that might permit PAS. The essay concludes with reflections on the relationship between feminism and questions of agency, especially women's agency.
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  • On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics.Janet L. Borgerson - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):477-509.
    If business requires ethical solutions that are viable in the liminal landscape between concepts and corporate office, then business ethics and corporate social responsibility should offer tools that can survive the trek, that flourish in this well-traveled, but often unarticulated, environment. Indeed, feminist ethics produces, accesses, and engages such tools. However, work in BE and CSR consistently conflates feminist ethics and feminine ethics and care ethics. I offer clarification and invoke the analytic power of three feminist ethicists 'in action' whose (...)
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  • Book Review: Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. [REVIEW]Leslie Bender - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):58-61.
  • Guidelines for Physician-Assisted Suicide: Can the Challenge Be Met?Carl H. Coleman & Alan R. Fleischman - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):217-224.
    The question of legalizing physician-assisted suicide has become a serious public debate. Growing interest in assisted suicide reflects a public increasingly fearful of the process of dying, particularly the prospect of dying a painful, protracted, or undignified death. PAS has been proposed as a compassionate response to unrelievable suffering, designed to give terminally or incurably ill individuals direct control over the timing, manner, and circumstances of their death. Although the American Medical Association remains firmly opposed to legalizing PAS, many physicians (...)
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  • Guidelines for Physician-Assisted Suicide: Can the Challenge Be Met?Carl H. Coleman & Alan R. Fleischman - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):217-224.
    The question of legalizing physician-assisted suicide has become a serious public debate. Growing interest in assisted suicide reflects a public increasingly fearful of the process of dying, particularly the prospect of dying a painful, protracted, or undignified death. PAS has been proposed as a compassionate response to unrelievable suffering, designed to give terminally or incurably ill individuals direct control over the timing, manner, and circumstances of their death. Although the American Medical Association remains firmly opposed to legalizing PAS, many physicians (...)
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  • Scientific Reforms, Feminist Interventions, and the Politics of Knowing: An Auto‐Ethnography of a Feminist Neuroscientist.Sara Giordano - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):755-773.
    Feminist science studies scholars have documented the historical and cultural contingency of scientific knowledge production. It follows that political and social activism has impacted the practice of science today; however, little has been done to examine the current cultures of science in light of feminist critiques and activism. In this article, I argue that, although critiques have changed the cultures of science both directly and indirectly, fundamental epistemological questions have largely been ignored and neutralized through these policy reforms. I provide (...)
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  • Autonomy and Reason: Treatment Choice in Breast Cancer.Mary Twomey - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1045-1050.
  • When Health Means Wealth, Can Bioethicists Respond?Helen Bequaert Holmes - 2001 - Health Care Analysis 9 (2):213-228.
    Around the world the wealthy can get their lives extended while the poorget little basic medical help. Over the same years that the field ofbioethics has prospered and expanded, this disparity has increased.Reasons for the failure of bioethics to successfully address thishealth/wealth issue include its identification with the cognitiveand social authority of medicine; its gatekeeping behavior;its funding sources; its questionable use of ``principlism'' andits emphasis on crises and dilemmas to the neglect of ``housekeeping''issues. The work of most women in bioethics (...)
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  • Deciding on Death: Conventions and Contestations in the Context of Disability. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):209-219.
    Conflicts between bioethicists and disability theorists often arise over the permissibility of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. Where mainstream bioethicists propose universalist guidelines that will direct action across a range of effectively disembodied situations, and take for granted that moral agency requires autonomy, feminist bioethicists demand a contextualisation of the circumstances under which moral decision making is conducted, and stress a more relational view of autonomy that does not require strict standards of independent agency. Nonetheless, neither traditional nor feminist perspectives (...)
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  • The Ethics of Aggregation and Hormone Replacement Therapy.Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Evan R. Myers & Ruth R. Faden - 2001 - Health Care Analysis 9 (2):187-211.
    The use of aggregated quality of life estimatesin the formation of public policy and practiceguidelines raises concerns about the moralrelevance of variability in values inpreferences for health care. This variabilitymay reflect unique and deeply held beliefs thatmay be lost when averaged with the preferencesof other individuals. Feminist moral theorieswhich argue for attention to context andparticularity underline the importance ofascertaining the extent to which differences inpreferences for health states revealinformation which is morally relevant toclinicians and policymakers. To facilitatethese considerations, we present (...)
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  • ‘You Say You’Re Happy, But…’: Contested Quality of Life Judgments in Bioethics and Disability Studies. [REVIEW]Sara Goering - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):125-135.
    In this paper, I look at several examples that demonstrate what I see as a troubling tendency in much of mainstream bioethics to discount the views of disabled people. Following feminist political theorists who argue in favour of a stance of humility and sensitive inclusion for people who have been marginalized, I recommend that bioethicists adopt a presumption in favour of believing rather than discounting the claims of disabled people. By taking their claims at face value and engaging with disabled (...)
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  • The Limits of Traditional Approaches to Informed Consent for Genomic Medicine.Thomas May, Kaija L. Zusevics, Arthur Derse, Kimberly A. Strong, Jessica Jeruzal, Alison La Pean Kirschner, Michael H. Farrell & Ryan Spellecy - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (3):185-202.
    This paper argues that it will be important for new genomic technologies to recognize the limits of traditional approaches to informed consent, so that other-regarding implications of genomic information can be properly contextualized and individual rights respected. Respect for individual autonomy will increasingly require dynamic consideration of the interrelated dimensions of individual and broader community interests, so that the interests of one do not undermine fundamental interests of the other. In this, protection of individual rights will be a complex interplay (...)
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  • Book Review: Christine Overall. Aging, Death, and Human Longevity: A phiLosophical Inquiry. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2003. [REVIEW]Mary Briody Mahowald - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):226-229.
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  • Book Review: Christine Overall. Aging, Death, and Human Longevity: A Philosophical Inquiry. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2003. [REVIEW]Mary Briody Mahowald - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):226-229.
  • Inclusion and Exclusion in Women's Access to Health and Medicine.Susan Dodds - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):58-79.
    Women's access to health and medicine in developed countries has been characterized by a range of inconsistent inclusions and exclusions. Health policy has been asymmetrically interested in womens reproductive capacities and has sought to regulate, control, and manage aspects of womens reproductive decision making in a manner unwitnessed in relation to men's reproductive health and reproductive decision making. In other areas, research that addresses health concerns that affect both men and women sometimes is designed so as not to yield data (...)
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  • Theory and Bioethics.John Arras - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Global Bioethics.Heather Widdows, Donna Dickenson & Sirkku Hellsten - 2003 - New Review of Bioethics 1 (1):101-116.
    The emergence of global bioethics is connected to a rise of interest in ethics in general (both in academia and in the public sphere), combined with an increasing awareness of the interrelatedness of peoples and their ethical dilemmas, and the recognition that global problems need global solutions. In short, global bioethics has two distinguishing features: first, its global scope, both geographically and conceptually; and second, its focus on justice (communal and individual).
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  • Feminist Bioethics.Anne Donchin - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.