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Wittgenstein's lectures on philosophical psychology, 1946-47

Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Edited by P. T. Geach (1988)

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  1. Taking a Look at History.Vasso Kindi - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 8 (1):96-117.
    Ian Hacking urged that philosophers take a look at history. He called his recommendation the “Lockean imperative”. In the present paper I examine how Hacking understands the relation between philosophy and history by concentrating on his 1990 essay “Two kinds of ‘New Historicism’ for philosophers”. In this particular paper Hacking uses the visual metaphor of ‘taking a look’ which can also be found in the work of two other philosophers, Kuhn and Foucault, who are called by Hacking his mentors. I (...)
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  • The aspect-perception passages: A critical investigation of Köhler's isomorphism principle.Gloria Ayob - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (3):264-280.
    In this paper I argue that Wittgenstein's aim in the aspect-perception passages is to critically evaluate a specific hypothesis. The target hypothesis in these passages is the Gestalt psychologist Köhler's "isomorphism principle." According to this principle, there are neural correlates of conscious perceptual experience, and these neural correlates determine the content of our perceptual experiences. Wittgenstein's argument against the isomorphism principle comprises two steps. First, he diffuses the substantiveness of the principle by undermining an important assumption that underpins this principle, (...)
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  • Wittgenstein and Friendship.Beth Savickey - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):185-194.
    In his article “It's a Wonderful Life,” Ronald Hall connects Wittgenstein's last words with Frank Capra's 1946 film. His analysis focuses on the concept of wonder, but he misses one of the most important aspects of both the film and Wittgenstein's last words: the significance of friendship. This is philosophically (and biographically) important because it raises questions about aspect-seeing, friendship and everyday life. Wittgenstein's final words provide a striking example of the philosophical complexity of his life and work.
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  • A Reconsideration of the Relation Between Kuhnian Incommensurability and Translation.Vasso Kindi - 2017 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 31 (4):397-414.
    Up to the introduction of the term and concept of incommensurability by T. S. Kuhn and P. K. Feyerabend in the early 1960s, scientific texts were supposed to pose no problem as regards their translation, unlike literature, which was thought very difficult to translate. After the introduction of the term, translation of scientific language became equally problematic because, due to conceptual and perceptual incommensurability, there was no common observation basis to ground linguistic equivalences between languages of incommensurable paradigms. This article (...)
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  • Wittgenstein on the Place of the Concept “Noticing an Aspect”.Janette Dinishak - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (1):320-339.
    Seeing aspects is a dominant theme in Wittgenstein's 1940s writings on philosophy of psychology. Interpreters disagree about what Wittgenstein was trying to do in these discussions. I argue that interpreting Wittgenstein's observations about the interrelations between “noticing an aspect” and other psychological concepts as a systematic theory of aspect-seeing diminishes key lessons of Wittgenstein's explorations: these interrelations are enormously complicated and “noticing an aspect” resists neat classification. Further, Wittgenstein invites us to engage in his “placing activity,” and by doing so (...)
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  • Reflections on editing Moore's notes in Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933.David G. Stern - 2017 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 30:225-234.
    The essay begins by briefly reviewing the complex history of the collaborative long-distance editing work that led to the publication of Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933 (Cambridge UP, 2016). It then turns to a discussion of the rationale for the innovative editorial policies we ultimately developed and implemented, and some of the broader methodological issues that they raise.
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  • ¿Era Wittgenstein pragmatista, los pragmatistas son wittgensteinianos, o ni una cosa ni la otra?: Sobre reglas, verdades y acciones sociales.Miguel Ángel Quintana Paz - 2010 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía:275-292.
    Existe una aparente incongruencia entre, por una parte, la gran distancia que Ludwig Wittgenstein detectaba entre sus objetivos filosóficos y los de los pragmatistas y, por otra, el acercamiento que posteriormente se ha producido en la historia de la recepción de la filosofía wittgensteiniana entre esta y el (neo)pragmatismo. Con afán de tratar de arrojar algo de luz sobre tal discordancia, nos ocuparemos aquí de modo privilegiado en las reflexiones de Wittgenstein en torno al cumplimiento de reglas (es decir, sobre (...)
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