Switch to: References

Citations of:

Two Aspects of Platonic Recollection

Apeiron 35 (2):131 - 152 (2002)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Is Plato an Innatist in the Meno?David Bronstein & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):392-430.
    Plato in the Meno is standardly interpreted as committed to condition innatism: human beings are born with latent innate states of knowledge. Against this view, Gail Fine has argued for prenatalism: human souls possess knowledge in a disembodied state but lose it upon being embodied. We argue against both views and in favor of content innatism: human beings are born with innate cognitive contents that can be, but do not exist innately in the soul as, the contents of states of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The State of the Question in the Study of Plato: Twenty Year Update.Gerald A. Press - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):9-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Divine Feeling: The Epistemic Function of Erotic Desire in Plato’s Theory of Recollection.Laura Candiotto - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (2):445-462.
    In the so-called “erotic dialogues”, especially the Symposium and the Phaedrus, Plato explained why erotic desire can play an epistemic function, establishing a strong connection between erotic desire and beauty, “the most clearly visible and the most loved” among the Ideas. Taking the erotic dialogues as a background, in this paper I elucidate Plato’s explanation in another context, the one of the Phaedo, for discussing the epistemic function of erotic desire in relation to the deficiency argument and the affinity argument. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Recollection and Philosophical Reflection in Plato's Phaedo.Lee Franklin - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (4):289-314.
    Interpretations of recollection in the "Phaedo" are divided between ordinary interpretations, on which recollection explains a kind of learning accomplished by all, and sophisticated interpretations, which restrict recollection to philosophers. A sophisticated interpretation is supported by the prominence of philosophical understanding and reflection in the argument. Recollection is supposed to explain the advanced understanding displayed by Socrates and Simmias (74b2-4). Furthermore, it seems to be a necessary condition on recollection that one who recollects also perform a comparison of sensible particulars (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations