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  1. Philosophy 
of 
the 
Cognitive 
Sciences.William Bechtel & Mitchell Herschbach - 2010-01-04 - In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 239--261.
    Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary research endeavor focusing on human cognitive phenomena such as memory, language use, and reasoning. It emerged in the second half of the 20th century and is charting new directions at the beginning of the 21st century. This chapter begins by identifying the disciplines that contribute to cognitive science and reviewing the history of the interdisciplinary engagements that characterize it. The second section examines the role that mechanistic explanation plays in cognitive science, while the third focuses (...)
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  • Why study movement variability in autism?Maria Brincker & Elizabeth Torres - 2017 - In Torres Elizabeth & Whyatt Caroline (eds.), Autism the movement-sensing approach. CRC Press - Taylor & Francis Group.
    Autism has been defined as a disorder of social cognition, interaction and communication where ritualistic, repetitive behaviors are commonly observed. But how should we understand the behavioral and cognitive differences that have been the main focus of so much autism research? Can high-level cognitive processes and behaviors be identified as the core issues people with autism face, or do these characteristics perhaps often rather reflect individual attempts to cope with underlying physiological issues? Much research presented in this volume will point (...)
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  • Interpersonal Synchronization, Motor Coordination, and Control Are Impaired During a Dynamic Imitation Task in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.Jean Xavier, Soizic Gauthier, David Cohen, Mohamed Zahoui, Mohamed Chetouani, François Villa, Alain Berthoz & Salvatore Anzalone - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Causal beliefs lead to toolmaking, which require handedness for motor control.Lewis Wolpert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):242-242.
    Toolmaking requires motor skills that in turn require handedness, so that there is no competition between the two sides of the brain. Thus, handedness is not necessarily linked to vocalization but to the origin of causal beliefs required for making complex tools. Language may have evolved from these processes.
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  • Why Studies of Autism Spectrum Disorders Have Failed to Resolve the Theory Theory Versus Simulation Theory Debate.Meredith R. Wilkinson & Linden J. Ball - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (2):263-291.
    The Theory Theory (TT) versus Simulation Theory (ST) debate is primarily concerned with how we understand others’ mental states. Theory theorists claim we do this using rules that are akin to theoretical laws, whereas simulation theorists claim we use our own minds to imagine ourselves in another’s position. Theorists from both camps suggest a consideration of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can help resolve the TT/ST debate (e.g., Baron-Cohen 1995; Carruthers 1996a; Goldman 2006). We present a three-part argument that (...)
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  • Social top-down response modulation (STORM): a model of the control of mimicry in social interaction.Yin Wang & Antonia F. De C. Hamilton - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  • The evolution of foresight: What is mental time travel, and is it unique to humans?Thomas Suddendorf & Michael C. Corballis - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):299-313.
    In a dynamic world, mechanisms allowing prediction of future situations can provide a selective advantage. We suggest that memory systems differ in the degree of flexibility they offer for anticipatory behavior and put forward a corresponding taxonomy of prospection. The adaptive advantage of any memory system can only lie in what it contributes for future survival. The most flexible is episodic memory, which we suggest is part of a more general faculty of mental time travel that allows us not only (...)
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  • Embodying gestures: The social orienting model and the study of early gestures in autism. [REVIEW]Laura Sparaci - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):203-223.
    Autistic spectrum disorders impair the ability to interact socially. Detecting and understanding their onset is not only an empirical enterprise, but also a theoretical one, often linked to studies on intersubjectivity. Different theoretical perspectives have been elaborated in the past to account for the deficit. The main purpose of this paper is to reinforce and offer empirical grounding to a recent approach, termed Social Orienting Model, by presenting the main theoretical approaches to autism and contrasting them to this view, as (...)
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  • Moving Ourselves, Moving Others: Motion and Emotion in Intersubjectivity, Consciousness, and Language.Andrea Schiavio - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):735-739.
  • Editorial: Dynamic Emotional Communication.Wataru Sato, Eva G. Krumhuber, Tjeerd Jellema & Justin H. G. Williams - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Infants’ Understanding of Object-Directed Action: An Interdisciplinary Synthesis.Scott J. Robson & Valerie A. Kuhlmeier - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Modeling self on others: An import theory of subjectivity and selfhood.Wolfgang Prinz - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 49:347-362.
  • Empathy, mirror neurons and SYNC.Ryszard Praszkier - 2016 - Mind and Society 15 (1):1-25.
    This article explains how people synchronize their thoughts through empathetic relationships and points out the elementary neuronal mechanisms orchestrating this process. The many dimensions of empathy are discussed, as is the manner by which empathy affects health and disorders. A case study of teaching children empathy, with positive results, is presented. Mirror neurons, the recently discovered mechanism underlying empathy, are characterized, followed by a theory of brain-to-brain coupling. This neuro-tuning, seen as a kind of synchronization between brains and between individuals, (...)
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  • I Feel Your Pain: Embodied Knowledges and Situated Neurons.Victoria Pitts-Taylor - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):852-869.
    The widely touted discovery of mirror neurons has generated intense scientific interest in the neurobiology of intersubjectivity. Social neuroscientists have claimed that mirror neurons, located in brain regions associated with motor action, facial recognition, and somatosensory processing, allow us to automatically grasp other people's intentions and emotions. Despite controversies, mirror neuron research is animating materialist, affective, and embodied accounts of intersubjectivity. My view is that mirror neurons raise issues that are directly relevant to feminism and cultural studies, but interventions are (...)
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  • Toward a mechanistic psychology of dialogue.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):169-190.
    Traditional mechanistic accounts of language processing derive almost entirely from the study of monologue. Yet, the most natural and basic form of language use is dialogue. As a result, these accounts may only offer limited theories of the mechanisms that underlie language processing in general. We propose a mechanistic account of dialogue, the interactive alignment account, and use it to derive a number of predictions about basic language processes. The account assumes that, in dialogue, the linguistic representations employed by the (...)
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  • Towards a unified science of cultural evolution.Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good match with (...)
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  • The proximate mechanisms and ultimate functions of smiles.Marc Mehu & Karim N'Diaye - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):454-455.
    Niedenthal et al's classification of smiles erroneously conflates psychological mechanisms and adaptive functions. This confusion weakens the rationale behind the types of smiles they chose to individuate, and it obfuscates the distinction between the communicative versus denotative nature of smiles and the role of perceived-gaze direction in emotion recognition.
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  • Activation of Mirror Neuron Regions Is Altered in Developmental Coordination Disorder –Neurophysiological Evidence Using an Action Observation Paradigm.Jessica M. Lust, Hein T. van Schie, Peter H. Wilson, Jurjen van der Helden, Ben Pelzer & Bert Steenbergen - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  • The shared circuits model. How control, mirroring, and simulation can enable imitation and mind reading.Susan Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines; it is here surveyed under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring and simulation. It is cast at a middle, (...)
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  • Imitation, media violence, and freedom of speech.Susan Hurley - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):165-218.
  • Different Aspects of Emotional Awareness in Relation to Motor Cognition and Autism Traits.Charlotte F. Huggins, Isobel M. Cameron & Justin H. G. Williams - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Cognitive Evolution, Population, Transmission, and Material Culture.Derek Hodgson - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (3):237-246.
    There has been much debate regarding when modern human cognition arose. It was previously thought that the technocomplexes and artifacts associated with a particular timeframe during the Upper Paleolithic could provide a proxy for identifying the signature of modern cognition. It now appears that this approach has underestimated the complexity of human behavior on a number of different levels. As the artifacts, once thought to be confined to Europe 40,000 years ago onwards, can now be found in other parts of (...)
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  • Explaining the Gap: On Humans and Other Animals – Essay Review: Thomas Suddendorf: The Gap: The Science of What Separates Us from Other Animals. [REVIEW]Oren Harman - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):739-755.
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  • A framework for the unification of the behavioral sciences.Herbert Gintis - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):1-16.
    The various behavioral disciplines model human behavior in distinct and incompatible ways. Yet, recent theoretical and empirical developments have created the conditions for rendering coherent the areas of overlap of the various behavioral disciplines. The analytical tools deployed in this task incorporate core principles from several behavioral disciplines. The proposed framework recognizes evolutionary theory, covering both genetic and cultural evolution, as the integrating principle of behavioral science. Moreover, if decision theory and game theory are broadened to encompass other-regarding preferences, they (...)
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  • Observational Learning in Low-Functioning Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Behavioral and Neuroimaging Study.Francesca Foti, Fabrizio Piras, Stefano Vicari, Laura Mandolesi, Laura Petrosini & Deny Menghini - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Impairments of Social Motor Synchrony Evident in Autism Spectrum Disorder.Paula Fitzpatrick, Jean A. Frazier, David M. Cochran, Teresa Mitchell, Caitlin Coleman & R. C. Schmidt - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Exploring associations between gaze patterns and putative human mirror neuron system activity.Peter H. Donaldson, Caroline Gurvich, Joanne Fielding & Peter G. Enticott - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Which empathy? Limitations in the mirrored “understanding” of emotion.Remy Debes - 2010 - Synthese 175 (2):219-239.
    The recent discovery of so-called “mirror-neurons” in monkeys and a corresponding mirroring “system” in humans has provoked wide endorsement of the claim that humans understand a variety of observed actions, somatic sensations, and emotions via a kind of direct representation of those actions, sensations, and emotions. Philosophical efforts to assess the import of such “mirrored understanding” have typically focused on how that understanding might be brought to bear on theories of mindreading, and usually in cases of action. By contrast, this (...)
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  • Individual differences in social and non-social cognitive control.Kohinoor M. Darda, Emily E. Butler & Richard Ramsey - 2020 - Cognition 202:104317.
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  • Psychosis and autism as diametrical disorders of the social brain.Bernard Crespi & Christopher Badcock - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):241-261.
    Autistic-spectrum conditions and psychotic-spectrum conditions (mainly schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression) represent two major suites of disorders of human cognition, affect, and behavior that involve altered development and function of the social brain. We describe evidence that a large set of phenotypic traits exhibit diametrically opposite phenotypes in autistic-spectrum versus psychotic-spectrum conditions, with a focus on schizophrenia. This suite of traits is inter-correlated, in that autism involves a general pattern of constrained overgrowth, whereas schizophrenia involves undergrowth. These disorders also (...)
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  • From mouth to hand: Gesture, speech, and the evolution of right-handedness.Michael C. Corballis - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):199-208.
    The strong predominance of right-handedness appears to be a uniquely human characteristic, whereas the left-cerebral dominance for vocalization occurs in many species, including frogs, birds, and mammals. Right-handedness may have arisen because of an association between manual gestures and vocalization in the evolution of language. I argue that language evolved from manual gestures, gradually incorporating vocal elements. The transition may be traced through changes in the function of Broca's area. Its homologue in monkeys has nothing to do with vocal control, (...)
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  • The Social Effect of “Being Imitated” in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.Annarita Contaldo, Costanza Colombi, Antonio Narzisi & Filippo Muratori - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Characterizing the Action-Observation Network Through Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: A Review.Emma E. Condy, Helga O. Miguel, John Millerhagen, Doug Harrison, Kosar Khaksari, Nathan Fox & Amir Gandjbakhche - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy is a neuroimaging technique that has undergone tremendous growth over the last decade due to methodological advantages over other measures of brain activation. The action-observation network, a system of brain structures proposed to have “mirroring” abilities, has been studied in humans through neural measures such as fMRI and electroencephalogram ; however, limitations of these methods are problematic for AON paradigms. For this reason, fNIRS is proposed as a solution to investigating the AON in humans. The present review (...)
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  • Understanding the imitation deficit in autism may lead to a more specific model of autism as an empathy disorder.Tony Charman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):29-30.
    Preston & de Waal are understandably cautious in applying their model to autism. They emphasise multiple cognitive impairments in autism, including prefrontal-executive, cerebellar-attention, and amygdala-emotion recognition deficits. Further empirical examination of imitation ability in autism may reveal deficits in the neural and cognitive basis of perception-action mapping that have a specific relation to the empathic deficit.
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  • Mirroring cannot account for understanding action.Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):23-24.
    Susan Hurley's shared circuits model (SCM) rightly begins in action and progresses through a series of layers; but it fails to reach action understanding because it relies on mirroring as a driving force, draws on heavily criticized theories, and neglects the need for shared experience in our grasp of social understanding.
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  • Beyond smiles: The impact of culture and race in embodying and decoding facial expressions.Roberto Caldara - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):438-439.
    Understanding the very nature of the smile with an integrative approach and a novel model is a fertile ground for a new theoretical vision and insights. However, from this perspective, I challenge the authors to integrate culture and race in their model, because both factors would impact upon the embodying and decoding of facial expressions.
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  • Neurophysiological bases underlying the organization of intentional actions and the understanding of others' intention.Luca Bonini, Pier Francesco Ferrari & Leonardo Fogassi - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):1095-1104.
  • Enhancing “theory of mind” through behavioral synchrony.Adam Baimel, Rachel L. Severson, Andrew S. Baron & Susan A. J. Birch - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Implicit action encoding influences personal-trait judgments.Patric Bach & Steven P. Tipper - 2007 - Cognition 102 (2):151-178.
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  • Do Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Understand Pantomimic Events?Ines Adornetti, Francesco Ferretti, Alessandra Chiera, Slawomir Wacewicz, Przemysław Żywiczyński, Valentina Deriu, Andrea Marini, Rita Magni, Laura Casula, Stefano Vicari & Giovanni Valeri - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Humanoid theory grounding.Christopher G. Prince & Eric J. Mislivec - unknown
    In this paper we consider the importance of using a humanoid physical form for a certain proposed kind of robotics, that of theory grounding. Theory grounding involves grounding the theory skills and knowledge of an embodied artificially intelligent system by developing theory skills and knowledge from the bottom up. Theory grounding can potentially occur in a variety of domains, and the particular domain considered here is that of language. Language is taken to be another “problem space” in which a system (...)
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  • A Phenomenological Approach to Clinical Empathy: Rethinking Empathy Within its Intersubjective and Affective Contexts.Hardy Carter - 2017 - Dissertation, University of South Florida
    This dissertation contributes to the philosophy of empathy and biomedical ethics by drawing on phenomenological approaches to empathy, intersubjectivity, and affectivity in order to contest the primacy of the intersubjective aspect of empathy at the cost of its affective aspect. Both aspects need to be explained in order for empathy to be accurately understood in philosophical works, as well as practically useful for patient care in biomedical ethics. In the first chapter, I examine the current state of clinical empathy in (...)
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  • Modulation of motor cortex activity when observing rewarding and punishing actions.Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne - 2013 - Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while participants watched (...)
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  • The Simulating Social Mind: The Role of the Mirror Neuron System and Simulation in the Social and Communicative Deficits of Autism Spectrum Disorders.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - unknown
    The mechanism by which humans perceive others differs greatly from how humans perceive inanimate objects. Unlike inanimate objects, humans have the distinct property of being “like me” in the eyes of the observer. This allows us to use the same systems that process knowledge about self-performed actions, self-conceived thoughts, and self-experienced emotions to understand actions, thoughts, and emotions in others. The authors propose that internal simulation mechanisms, such as the mirror neuron system, are necessary for normal development of recognition, imitation, (...)
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  • How and Why the Brain Lays the Foundations for a Conscious Self.M. V. Butz - 2008 - Constructivist Foundations 4 (1):1-37.
    Purpose: Constructivism postulates that the perceived reality is a complex construct formed during development. Depending on the particular school, these inner constructs take on different forms and structures and affect cognition in different ways. The purpose of this article is to address the questions of how and, even more importantly, why we form such inner constructs. Approach: This article proposes that brain development is controlled by an inherent anticipatory drive, which biases learning towards the formation of forward predictive structures and (...)
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  • From Imitation to Reciprocation and Mutual Recognition.Claudia Passos-Ferreira & Philippe Rochat - 2008 - In Jaime A. Pineda (ed.), Mirror Neuron Systems: The Role of Mirroring Processes in Social Cognition. Springer Science. pp. 191-212.
    Imitation and mirroring processes are necessary but not sufficient conditions for children to develop human sociality. Human sociality entails more than the equivalence and connectedness of perceptual experiences. It corresponds to the sense of a shared world made of shared values. It originates from complex ‘open’ systems of reciprocation and negotiation, not just imitation and mirroring processes that are by definition ‘closed’ systems. From this premise, we argue that if imitation and mirror processes are important foundations for sociality, human inter-subjectivity (...)
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  • Beyond Cognition: Philosophical Issues in Autism.Emma Peng Chien - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Alberta
    This dissertation explores philosophical issues in autism and defends a new version of the enactive approach to autism and social cognition. The discussion in this dissertation centres around the question “why do autistics encounter social interaction problems?”, addressing this question in ways that raise broader philosophical issues. Within the philosophy of mind, these include the problem of other minds, the nature of emotions, and narratives and their role in understanding the self. Beyond cognition, such issues are intertwined with questions in (...)
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  • Autism: the micro-movement perspective.Elizabeth B. Torres, Maria Brincker, Robert W. Isenhower, Polina Yanovich, Kimberly Stigler, John I. Nurnberger, Dimitri N. Metaxas & Jorge V. Jose - 2013 - Frontiers Integrated Neuroscience 7 (32).
    The current assessment of behaviors in the inventories to diagnose autism spectrum disorders (ASD) focus on observation and discrete categorizations. Behaviors require movements, yet measurements of physical movements are seldom included. Their inclusion however, could provide an objective characterization of behavior to help unveil interactions between the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Such interactions are critical for the development and maintenance of spontaneous autonomy, self-regulation and voluntary control. At present, current approaches cannot deal with the heterogeneous, dynamic and stochastic (...)
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  • Index-plan du site Résumé-vulgarisation.Ralph Adolphs - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3:12.
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