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  1. In Excess of Epistemology: Siegel, Taylor, Heidegger and the Conditions of Thought.Emma Williams - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (1):142-160.
    Harvey Siegel's epistemologically-informed conception of critical thinking is one of the most influential accounts of critical thinking around today. In this article, I seek to open up an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one defended by Siegel. I do this by re-reading an opposing view, which Siegel himself rejects as leaving epistemology ‘pretty much as it is’. This is the view proposed by Charles Taylor in his paper ‘Overcoming Epistemology’. Crucially, my aim here is not to defend (...)
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  • The Inner Violence of Reason: Re‐Reading Heidegger Via Education.Vasco D'Agnese - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (3):435-455.
    Since Plato, Western thought has framed knowing as a method within ‘some realm of what is’ and a predetermined ‘sphere of objects’. The roots and the consequences of this stance towards reason and truth were noted by Heidegger, who equates the history of Western thought with the history of metaphysics. Since Plato, truth has relied on definition, hierarchy and mastery. Discourse on the truth begins to be discourse on the limits of things and, thus, on who is able to set (...)
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  • Heidegger's Theory of Truth and its Importance for the Quality of Qualitative Research.Rauno Huttunen & Leena Kakkori - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (3):600-616.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  • Out of the Ordinary: Incorporating Limits with Austin and Derrida.Emma Williams - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (12):1-16.
    This article seeks to open up a re-examination of the relationship between thought and language by reference to two philosophers: John Austin and Jacques Derrida. While in traditional philosophical terms these thinkers stand far apart, recent work in the philosophy of education has highlighted the importance of Austin’s work in a way that has begun to bridge the philosophical divide. This article seeks to continue the renewed interest in Austin in educational research, yet also take it in new direction by (...)
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