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  1. Embracing Asymmetry and Humility in the Face of Disability.Licia Carlson - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (3):28-29.
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  • Relational Potential Versus the Parent‐Child Relationship.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (3):26-27.
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  • Relational suffering and the moral authority of love and care.Georgina D. Campelia, Jennifer C. Kett & Aaron Wightman - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):165-178.
    Suffering is a ubiquitous yet elusive concept in health care. In a field devoted to the pursuit of objective data, suffering is a phenomenon with deep ties to subjective experience, moral values, and cultural norms. Suffering’s tie to subjective experience makes it challenging to discern and respond to the suffering of others. In particular, the question of whether a child with profound neurocognitive disabilities can suffer has generated a robust discourse, rooted in philosophical conceptualizations of personhood as well as the (...)
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  • Analyzing the Paradigmatic Cases of Two Persons with a Disorder of Consciousness: Reflections on the Legal and Ethical Perspectives.Davide Sattin, Davide Torri, Lino Panzeri & Mario Picozzi - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundMedia have increasingly reported on the difficulties associated with end-of-life decision-making in patients with Disorders of Consciousness, contextualizing such dilemma in detailed accounts of the patient’s life. Two of the first stories debated in the scientific community were those related to the cases of two women, one American, the other Italian, who captured attention of millions of people in the first years of this third millennium.MethodsMuch has been written about the challenges of surrogate decision-making for patients in DOC, but less (...)
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  • Creating Space for Feminist Ethics in Medical School.Georgina D. Campelia & Ashley Feinsinger - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (2):111-124.
    Alongside clinical practice, medical schools now confront mounting reasons to examine nontraditional approaches to ethics. Increasing awareness of systems of oppression and their effects on the experiences of trainees, patients, professionals, and generally on medical care, is pushing medical curriculum into an unfamiliar territory. While there is room throughout medical school to take up these concerns, ethics curricula are well-positioned to explore new pedagogical approaches. Feminist ethics has long addressed systems of oppression and broader structures of power. Some of its (...)
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  • Relationships Help Make Life Worth Living.Aaron Wightman, Benjamin S. Wilfond, Douglas Diekema, Erin Paquette & Seema Shah - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):22-23.
    Decisions regarding life-sustaining medical treatments for young children with profound disabilities can be extremely challenging for families and clinicians. In this study, Brick and colleagues1 surveyed adult residents of the UK about their attitudes regarding withdrawal of treatment using a series of vignettes of infants with varying levels of intellectual and physical disability, based on real and hypothetical cases.1 This is an interesting study on an important topic. We first highlight the limitations of using these survey data to inform public (...)
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  • The Relational Threshold: A Life That is Valued, or a Life of Value?Dominic Wilkinson, Claudia Brick, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):24-25.
    The four thoughtful commentaries on our feature article draw out interesting empirical and normative questions. The aim of our study was to examine the views of a sample of the general public about a set of cases of disputed treatment for severely impaired infants.1 We compared those views with legal determinations that treatment was or was not in the infants’ best interests, and with some published ethical frameworks for decisions. We deliberately did not draw explicit ethical conclusions from our survey (...)
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