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  1. Social Origins of Cognition: Bartlett, Evolutionary Perspective and Embodied Mind Approach.Akiko Saito - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (4):399–421.
    This paper explores new avenues of research on social bases of cognition and a more adequate framework to conceive the phenomena of the human mind. It firstly examines Bartlett's work on social bases of cognition, from which three pertinent features are identified, namely multi-level analyses, evolutionary perspective and embodied mind approach. It then examines recent works on social origins of cognition in ethology and paleoanthropology, and various forms of the embodied mind approach recently proposed in neuroscience and cognitive science. The (...)
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  • From Genes to Mind to Culture: Biting the Bullet at Last.David P. Barash - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):7-8.
  • A Naturalistic Theory of Archaic Moral Orders.Donald T. Campbell - 1991 - Zygon 26 (1):91-114.
  • The Natural Selection of Altruistic Traits.Christopher Boehm - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (3):205-252.
    Proponents of the standard evolutionary biology paradigm explain human “altruism” in terms of either nepotism or strict reciprocity. On that basis our underlying nature is reduced to a function of inclusive fitness: human nature has to be totally selfish or nepotistic. Proposed here are three possible paths to giving costly aid to nonrelatives, paths that are controversial because they involve assumed pleiotropic effects or group selection. One path is pleiotropic subsidies that help to extend nepotistic helping behavior from close family (...)
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  • On the Nature of the Evolutionary Process: The Correspondence Between Theodosius Dobzhansky and John C. Greene. [REVIEW]John C. Greene & Michael Ruse - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):445-491.
    This is the correspondence (1959–1969), on the nature of the evolutionary process, between the biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky and the historian John C. Greene.
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  • The Biological Roots of Morality.Francisco J. Ayala - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (3):235-252.
    The question whether ethical behavior is biologically determined may refer either to thecapacity for ethics (e.i., the proclivity to judge human actions as either right or wrong), or to the moralnorms accepted by human beings for guiding their actions. My theses are: (1) that the capacity for ethics is a necessary attribute of human nature; and (2) that moral norms are products of cultural evolution, not of biological evolution.Humans exhibits ethical behavior by nature because their biological makeup determines the presence (...)
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  • On Mechanisms of Cultural Evolution, and the Evolution of Language and the Common Law.Michael T. Ghiselin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):11-11.
  • The Power of Reduction and the Limits of Compressibility.Hubert Markl - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):18-19.
  • Précis of Genes, Mind, and Culture.Charles J. Lumsden & Edward O. Wilson - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):1-7.
    Despite its importance, the linkage between genetic and cultural evolution has until now been little explored. An understanding of this linkage is needed to extend evolutionary theory so that it can deal for the first time with the phenomena of mind and human social history. We characterize the process of gene-culture coevolution, in which culture is shaped by biological imperatives while biological traits are simultaneously altered by genetic evolution in response to cultural history. A case is made from both theory (...)
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  • Genes and Culture, Protest and Communication.Charles J. Lumsden & Edward O. Wilson - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):31-37.
    Despite its importance, the linkage between genetic and cultural evolution has until now been little explored. An understanding of this linkage is needed to extend evolutionary theory so that it can deal for the first time with the phenomena of mind and human social history. We characterize the process of gene-culture coevolution, in which culture is shaped by biological imperatives while biological traits are simultaneously altered by genetic evolution in response to cultural history. A case is made from both theory (...)
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  • The Place of Mind, and the Limits of Amplification.Joachim F. Wohlwill - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):30-31.
  • Genes, Mind, and Culture; A Turning Point.Thomas Rhys Williams - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):29-30.
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  • Information, Feedback, and Transparency.Robert Van Gulick - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):27-29.
  • Resistance to Biological Self-Understanding.Pierre L. van den Berghe - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):27-27.
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  • A Bully Pulpit.L. B. Slobodkin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):26-27.
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  • Collaboration Between Biology and the Social Sciences: A Milestone.Joseph Shepher - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):25-26.
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  • Epigenesis: The Newer Synthesis?Glendon Schubert - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):24-25.
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  • Are There Culturgens?Alexander Rosenberg - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):22-24.
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  • Genes, Mind, and Emotion.Robert Plutchik - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):21-22.
  • Mind and the Linkage Between Genes and Culture.J. Maynard Smith - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):20-21.
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  • Toward a Natural Science of Human Culture.Roger D. Masters - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):19-20.
  • Top-Down Guidance From a Bottom-Up Theory.Geoffrey R. Loftus - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):17-18.
  • From Genes to Culture: The Missing Links.Joseph K. Kovach - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):15-17.
  • Concepts of Development in the Mathematics of Cultural Change.Timothy D. Johnston - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):14-15.
  • A Too Simple View of Population Genetics.Daniel L. Hartl - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):13-14.
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  • The “Culturgen”: Science or Science Fiction?C. R. Hallpike - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):12-13.
  • Genes for General Intellect Rather Than Particular Culture.Howard E. Gruber - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):11-12.
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  • Epigenesis and Culture.Robert Fagen - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):10-10.
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  • The Epigenetic Connection Between Genes and Culture: Environment to the Rescue.William R. Charlesworth - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):9-10.
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  • Stalking the Wild Culturgen.Arthur L. Caplan - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):8-9.
  • The Contributions of Science to Moral Education.Clive Jones - 1976 - Journal of Moral Education 5 (3):249-256.
    Abstract: Various claims have been made for a connection between moral education and science. The most prominent of these??'evolutionary ethics? ?? is examined and found to be philosophically unjustifiable. However, after an analysis of the form and content of scientific reasoning, it is concluded that some other claims are justifiable, in that there are connections of identity between science and morality in terms of logic, relevant knowledge, perspectives, and certain virtues, especially virtues of the will. These connections can be of (...)
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  • Ecosystems and Society: Implications for Sustainable Development.Hartmut Bossel - 1996 - World Futures 47 (2):143-213.
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