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  1. Relational Consequences of Perceived Deception in Online Shopping: The Moderating Roles of Type of Product, Consumer’s Attitude Toward the Internet and Consumer’s Demographics. [REVIEW]Sergio Román - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):373 - 391.
    This study investigates the negative influence of consumer's perceptions of online retailer's deceptive practices (perceived deception) on consumer's relational variables (satisfaction and loyalty intentions to the online retailer). Also, the moderating role of product type (goods versus services), consumer's attitude toward the Internet, and consumer's demographics in the deception-relational outcomes link is considered. Data from 398 online consumers revealed that satisfaction totally mediated the influence of deception on loyalty. Furthermore, the deception-satisfaction link was moderated by all the hypothesized variables. Interestingly, (...)
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  • Relational Consequences of Perceived Deception in Online Shopping: The Moderating Roles of Type of Product, Consumer’s Attitude Toward the Internet and Consumer’s Demographics.Sergio Román - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):373-391.
    This study investigates the negative influence of consumer’s perceptions of online retailer’s deceptive practices on consumer’s relational variables. Also, the moderating role of product type, consumer’s attitude toward the Internet, and consumer’s demographics in the deception-relational outcomes link is considered. Data from 398 online consumers revealed that satisfaction totally mediated the influence of deception on loyalty. Furthermore, the deception-satisfaction link was moderated by all the hypothesized variables. Interestingly, a direct effect of deception on loyalty was found among more educated consumers, (...)
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  • Ethical Ideologies Among Senior Managers in China.Bala Ramasamy & Matthew C. H. Yeung - 2013 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):129-145.
    The ethical judgment of Chinese business leaders has become increasingly important particularly due to the important role that China plays in the global economy. Previous studies tend to categorize Chinese managers as more relativist and thus more lenient in their ethical judgments. In this study we survey 256 senior managers from mainland China and find that they are in fact less relativist and more idealist than the global average. A significant portion of them are absolutists which imply that these managers (...)
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  • Societal-Level Versus Individual-Level Predictions of Ethical Behavior: A 48-Society Study of Collectivism and Individualism.David A. Ralston, Carolyn P. Egri, Olivier Furrer, Min-Hsun Kuo, Yongjuan Li, Florian Wangenheim, Marina Dabic, Irina Naoumova, Katsuhiko Shimizu, María Teresa Garza Carranza, Ping Ping Fu, Vojko V. Potocan, Andre Pekerti, Tomasz Lenartowicz, Narasimhan Srinivasan, Tania Casado, Ana Maria Rossi, Erna Szabo, Arif Butt, Ian Palmer, Prem Ramburuth, David M. Brock, Jane Terpstra-Tong, Ilya Grison, Emmanuelle Reynaud, Malika Richards, Philip Hallinger, Francisco B. Castro, Jaime Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Laurie Milton, Mahfooz Ansari, Arunas Starkus, Audra Mockaitis, Tevfik Dalgic, Fidel León-Darder, Hung Vu Thanh, Yong-lin Moon, Mario Molteni, Yongqing Fang, Jose Pla-Barber, Ruth Alas, Isabelle Maignan, Jorge C. Jesuino, Chay-Hoon Lee, Joel D. Nicholson, Ho-Beng Chia, Wade Danis, Ajantha S. Dharmasiri & Mark Weber - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (2):283–306.
    Is the societal-level of analysis sufficient today to understand the values of those in the global workforce? Or are individual-level analyses more appropriate for assessing the influence of values on ethical behaviors across country workforces? Using multi-level analyses for a 48-society sample, we test the utility of both the societal-level and individual-level dimensions of collectivism and individualism values for predicting ethical behaviors of business professionals. Our values-based behavioral analysis indicates that values at the individual-level make a more significant contribution to (...)
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  • A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996-2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable - awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  • A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375-413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996–2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable – awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  • Exploring Differential Ethical Perspectives Among Ghanaian Students.Randolph Nsor-Ambala - 2020 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):143-170.
    The study uses a dataset from Ghana to test for differential features regarding ethical orientation, among students based on eight categorisations. Data was collected by a questionnaire. The respondents were business students within Ghanaian universities and the number of useable responses was 79, out of a possible 100 students contacted, from an online survey. The results are mixed but substantially align with earlier studies except for a few deviations and a synthesis of the literature is used to explain the findings (...)
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  • The Role of Individual Variables, Organizational Variables and Moral Intensity Dimensions in Libyan Management Accountants’ Ethical Decision Making.Ahmed Musbah, Christopher J. Cowton & David Tyfa - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):335-358.
    This study investigates the association of a broad set of variables with the ethical decision making of management accountants in Libya. Adopting a cross-sectional methodology, a questionnaire including four different ethical scenarios was used to gather data from 229 participants. For each scenario, ethical decision making was examined in terms of the recognition, judgment and intention stages of Rest’s model. A significant relationship was found between ethical recognition and ethical judgment and also between ethical judgment and ethical intention, but ethical (...)
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  • Business Ethics Perceptions of Public and Private Sector Iranians.Bahaudin G. Mujtaba, Reza Tajaddini & Lisa Y. Chen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):433-447.
    Ethical maturity is a great concern to all educators, firms, and investors across the globe. This research surveyed 448 citizens, managers and employees in Iran to measure their Personal Business Ethics Scores (PBES) to see if age, education, management experience, and government work experience make a difference in making more ethical decisions. This study contributes to the theory of moral development across the Iranian culture as it is the first known study using this method. The results suggest that education and (...)
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  • The Effect of Top Management Trustworthiness on Turnover Intentions Via Negative Emotions: The Moderating Role of Gender.Sophie Mölders, Prisca Brosi, Matthias Spörrle & Isabell M. Welpe - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (4):957-969.
    Based on a field study, this paper explores the differential role that perceived top management trustworthiness has on female and male employees’ negative emotions and turnover intentions in organizations. A theoretical model is established that explicates a negative indirect effect of perceived top management trustworthiness on employee turnover intentions through employee negative emotions. The results reveal that there is a negative relationship between perceived top management trustworthiness and employee negative emotions and resulting turnover intentions and that this effect is stronger (...)
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  • Researcher Interaction Biases and Business Ethics Research: Respondent Reactions to Researcher Characteristics.Anthony D. Miyazaki & Kimberly A. Taylor - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):779-795.
    The potential for biased responses that occur when researchers interact with their study participants has long been of interest to both academicians and practitioners. Given the sensitive nature of the field, researcher interaction biases are of particular concern for business ethics researchers regardless of their preference for survey, experimental, or qualitative methodology. Whereas some ethics researchers may inadvertently bias data by misrecording or misinterpreting responses, other biases may occur when study participants' responses are systematically influenced by the mere introduction of (...)
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  • Organizational Ethics: Perceptions of Employees by Gender. [REVIEW]Charlotte McDaniel, Nancy Shoeps & John Lincourt - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):245 - 256.
    As more women enter the work force and assume management positions in corporations, increasing attention is being given to employment diversity. In addition, studies suggest that females have more propensity for ethics than males. However, these results may be debatable and limited data are available to substantiate these claims or assess gender differences among employees. Ethics codes can aid in supporting policies and enhancing corporate diversity. To assist one company in the development of an ethics code, a survey of 4005 (...)
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  • The Business of Ethics and Gender.A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101 - 116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624–635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to explore the influence of (...)
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  • ‘The Business of Ethics and Gender’.A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101-116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624-635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to explore the influence of (...)
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  • Ethical Ideology and Ethical Judgments in the Portuguese Accounting Profession.Pedro Augusto Marques & José Azevedo-Pereira - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):227-242.
    The purpose of the present study is to examine the attitudes of Portuguese chartered accountants with respect to questions of ethical nature that can arise in their professional activity. Respondents were asked to respond to the Ethics Position Questionnaire developed by Forsyth (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 39(1), 175–184, 1980), in order to determine their idealism and relativism levels. Subsequently, they answered questions about five scenarios related to accounting practices, with the objective of measuring their ethical judgments. Based on (...)
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  • Exposure to Ethics Education and the Perception of Linkage Between Organizational Ethical Behavior and Business Outcomes.Harsh K. Luthar & Ranjan Karri - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):353-368.
    This study focused on the effects of individual characteristics and exposure to ethics education on perceptions of the linkage between organizational ethical practices and business outcomes. Using a stratified sampling approach, 817 students were randomly selected from a population of approximately 1310 business students in an AACSB accredited college of business. Three hundred and twenty eight of the subjects were freshmen, 380 were seniors, and 109 were working managers and professionals enrolled in a night-time MBA program. Overall, the respondents included (...)
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  • Gender Differences in Ethics Judgment of Marketing Professionals in the United States.Daulatram B. Lund - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):501-515.
    This empirical investigation reexamines the impact of gender on ethics judgment of marketing professionals in a cross-section of firms in the United States. In the study, gender differences in ethics judgment focus on decisions in the context of marketing-mix elements (product, promotion, pricing, and distribution). The results of statistical analyses indicate that men and women marketing professionals differ significantly in their ethics judgment. Overall, female marketing professionals evinced significantly higher ethics judgment than their male counterparts. Given the changing demographics of (...)
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  • Religious Intensity, Evangelical Christianity, and Business Ethics: An Empirical Study.Justin G. Longenecker, Joseph A. McKinney & Carlos W. Moore - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):371-384.
    Research on the relationship between religious commitment and business ethics has produced widely varying results and made the impact of such commitment unclear. This study presents an empirical investigation based on a questionnaire survey of business managers and professionals in the United States yielding a database of 1234 respondents. Respondents evaluated the ethical acceptability of 16 business decisions. Findings varied with the way in which the religion variable was measured. Little relationship between religious commitment and ethical judgment was found when (...)
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  • Uncharted Territory: Investigating Individual Business Ethics in Cyprus.Maria Krambia-Kapardis & Anastasios Zopiatis - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):138–148.
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  • Uncharted Territory: Investigating Individual Business Ethics in Cyprus.Maria Krambia-Kapardis & Anastasios Zopiatis - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (2):138-148.
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  • The Relative Importance of Ethics as a Selection Criterion for Entry-Level Public Accountants: Does Gender Make a Difference?Nabil Ibrahim & John Angelidis - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):49 - 58.
    This paper examines public accountants' perceptions of the relative importance of business ethics as a selection criterion for entry-level public accounting positions. Also, it seeks to determine whether gender differences do exist with respect to these perceptions. The data were collected through a survey of 335 professional accountants in four southeastern states. The results show that, among the eight selection factors that were studied, technical competence in accounting, communication skills, and interpersonal skills were the most influential, while professionalism and leadership (...)
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  • Managers’ Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343-353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  • Managers' Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343 - 353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  • CEO Gender, Ethical Leadership, and Accounting Conservatism.Simon S. M. Ho, Annie Yuansha Li, Kinsun Tam & Feida Zhang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):351-370.
    Since male CEOs dominate corporate leadership, the literature on top management decision making suffers from an implicit masculine bias. Although research indicates that males and females are biologically and psychologically different, the leadership characteristics of female CEOs are largely unexplored. Two of these characteristics, risk aversion and ethical sensitivity, are tied to key accounting issues, such as conservatism in financial reporting and steadfast opposition to fraud. In this study, we examine the relationship between CEO gender and accounting conservatism, and find (...)
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  • Ethical Perceptions of Business Students in a New Zealand University: Do Gender, Age and Work Experience Matter?Gabriel Eweje & Margaret Brunton - 2010 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (1):95-111.
  • Ethical Perceptions of Business Students in a New Zealand University: Do Gender, Age and Work Experience Matter?Gabriel Eweje & Margaret Brunton - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (1):95-111.
    Ethical issues at the workplace have once again become topical and important due to considerable adverse publicity surrounding reports of unethical business practices by corporate managers. Accordingly, this paper re-visits the question of whether gender, age and work experience do have an effect on ethical judgement, using 655 business students as respondents. This is necessary as business students are likely to become managers during their career and will face complex ethical concerns and dilemmas in their daily, routine affairs. The findings (...)
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  • Consider the Following Scenario: “A Politically Connected White Western European Businessman Offers to Smooth the Way for Your Company to Sell in His Country … for a Fee.”.Neil Stuart Eccles & Busisiwe Magagula - 2019 - African Journal of Business Ethics 13 (1).
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  • A Meta-Analysis of Ethics Instruction Effectiveness in the Sciences.Lynn D. Devenport, Shane Connelly, Ryan P. Brown, Michael D. Mumford, Ethan P. Waples, Alison L. Antes & Stephen T. Murphy - 2009 - Ethics and Behavior 19 (5):379-402.
    Scholars have proposed a number of courses and programs intended to improve the ethical behavior of scientists in an attempt to maintain the integrity of the scientific enterprise. In the present study, we conducted a quantitative meta-analysis based on 26 previous ethics program evaluation efforts, and the results showed that the overall effectiveness of ethics instruction was modest. The effects of ethics instruction, however, were related to a number of instructional program factors, such as course content and delivery methods, in (...)
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  • Who Are These People? Personality Traits and Judgments About Trade Secret Misappropriation in Post‐Employment Activities.Hélène Delerue & Mariam Hamid - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (3):315-331.
    Trade secret theft is a problem that almost all organizations face. The greatest threat is employee mobility and potential unethical post-employment behavior. This study investigates the role of individual personality traits in judgments about trade secret misappropriation. Our hypotheses were tested in three studies addressing three different situational contexts: current employees, employees about to be laid off, and students who had quit their job. Relationships were estimated with robust regression. The results show that some personality traits predict judgment about another (...)
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  • A Cognitive–Intuitionist Model of Moral Judgment.Adenekan Dedeke - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):1-21.
    The study of moral decision-making presents to us two approaches for understanding such choices. The cognitive and the neurocognitive approaches postulate that reason and reasoning determines moral judgments. On the other hand, the intuitionist approaches postulate that automated intuitions mostly dominate moral judgments. There is a growing concern that neither of these approaches by itself captures all the key aspects of moral judgments. This paper draws on models from neurocognitive research and social-intuitionist research areas to propose an integrative cognitive–intuitive model (...)
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  • Perceptions of the Ethicality of Consumer Insurance Claim Fraud.Dwane Hal Dean - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (1):67-79.
    It was proposed that ethical evaluation of insurance claim padding behavior would be affected by characteristics of the policyholder, insurance agent, and company. These three factors were manipulated in written scenarios and the premise was tested in a factorial experimental design. No significant support was found for an effect of any of the three factors on ethical perceptions of claim padding. However, females found claims padding to be significantly less ethical than males. Given a claim scenario where the actual loss (...)
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  • Gender Differences in Ethics Research: The Importance of Controlling for the Social Desirability Response Bias. [REVIEW]Derek Dalton & Marc Ortegren - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):73-93.
    Gender is one of the most frequently studied variables within the ethics literature. In prior studies that find gender differences, females consistently report more ethical responses than males. However, prior research also indicates that females are more prone to responding in a socially desirable fashion. Consequently, it is uncertain whether gender differences in ethical decision-making exist because females are more ethical or perhaps because females are more prone to the social desirability response bias. Using a sample of 30 scenarios from (...)
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  • Gender Diversity in the Boardroom and Risk Management: A Case of R&D Investment.Shimin Chen, Xu Ni & Jamie Y. Tong - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):599-621.
    Increasing gender diversity in the boardroom has been promoted as a way to enhance corporate governance and risk management. This study empirically examines whether boards with more female directors play a role in reducing R&D risk. We first show that female directors help to reduce the positive relationship between R&D investment and future performance volatility. We then report that firms with more gender-diverse boards exhibit a lower adverse effect of R&D on the cost of debt. These results are robust to (...)
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  • What Makes Customers Discontent with Service Providers? An Empirical Analysis of Complaint Handling in Information and Communication Technology Services.C. Y. Chan Hubert & E. W. T. Ngai - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S1):73 - 110.
    The effectiveness of complaint handling and service recovery policies in customer retention has been the focus of both scholars and service organizations. In the past decade, Justice Theory has provided the basis of the dominant theoretical framework for complaint management and service recovery. However, it does not explicitly address unfair trade practices, which constitute an ethical issue. Favorable outcomes in complaint handling may not be able to restore the reputation of a company and the potential harm perceived by consumers. Using (...)
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  • Broadcasting Operation Iraqi Freedom: The People Behind Cable News Ethics, Decisions, and Gender Differences.Larry W. Boone & Christine R. MacDonald - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S1):115-134.
    In March 2003, President Bush declared the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom, the anticipated commencement of intensive American-led military operations in Iraq. With this declaration, the media began intense coverage of military operations from the field. For the first time, viewers were able to see images of actual events. This was due to three developments: the advancement of technology allowing immediate transmission of text and images, the actual presence of journalists identified as "embedded journalists" at military sites, and the fierce (...)
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  • Subjective Probability Assessments of the Incidence of Unethical Behavior: The Importance of Scenario-Respondent Fit.Darlene Bay & Alexey Nikitkov - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (1):1-11.
  • Subjective Probability Assessments of the Incidence of Unethical Behavior: The Importance of Scenario–Respondent Fit.Darlene Bay & Alexey Nikitkov - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (1):1-11.
    Largely due to the difficulty of observing behavior, empirical business ethics research relies heavily on the scenario methodology. While not disputing the usefulness of the technique, this paper highlights the importance of a careful assessment of the fit between the context of the situation described in the scenario and the knowledge and experience of the respondents. Based on a study of online auctions, we provide evidence that even respondents who have direct knowledge of the situation portrayed in the scenario may (...)
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  • Attitudes Toward Ethically Questionable Negotiation Tactics: A Two-Country Study.Moshe Banai, Abraham Stefanidis, Ana Shetach & Mehmet Ferhat Özbek - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (4):669-685.
    Current research has identified five discrete US negotiation tactics, a traditional one considered to be ethical, and four considered to be ethically questionable. Scholars have independently used culture to explain how the endorsement of these five negotiation tactics varies across nations. They have also independently used interpersonal trust and ethics propensity to explain antecedents of the endorsement of those five negotiation tactics. This research combines all those variables into one model that investigates the influence of horizontal and vertical individualism–collectivism, ethical (...)
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  • Culture, Gender, and GMAT Scores: Implications for Corporate Ethics.Raj Aggarwal, Joanne E. Goodell & John W. Goodell - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):125-143.
    Business leadership increasingly requires a master’s degree in business and graduate management admission test scores continue to be an important component of applications for admission to such programs. Given the ubiquitous use of GMAT scores as gatekeepers for business leadership, GMAT scores are likely to influence organizational ethical behavior through gender, cultural, and other biases in the GMAT. There is little prior literature in this area and we contribute by empirically documenting that GMAT scores are negatively related to the cultural (...)
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  • How Ethically Would Americans and Chinese Negotiate? The Effect of Intra-Cultural Versus Inter-Cultural Negotiations.Yu Yang, David De Cremer & Chao Wang - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):659-670.
    A growing body of research has started to examine how individuals from different countries may differ in their use of ethically questionable tactics during business negotiations. Whereas prior research focused on the main effect of the national culture or nationality of the negotiator, we add a new factor, which is the nationality of the counterpart. Looking at both these variables allows us to examine whether and how people may change their likelihood of using ethically questionable tactics in inter-cultural negotiations as (...)
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  • If You Can’T See the Forest for the Trees, You Might Just Cut Down the Forest: The Perils of Forced Choice on “Seemingly” Unethical Decision-Making.Michael O. Wood, Theodore J. Noseworthy & Scott R. Colwell - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):515-527.
    Why do otherwise well-intentioned managers make decisions that have negative social or environmental consequences? To answer this question, the authors combine the literature on construal level theory with the compromise effect to explore the circumstances that lead to seemingly unethical decision-making. The results of two studies suggest that the degree to which managers make high-risk tradeoffs is highly influenced by how they mentally represent the decision context. The authors find that managers are more likely to make seemingly unethical tradeoffs when (...)
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  • The Role of Mere Exposure Effect on Ethical Tolerance: A Two-Study Approach.William A. Weeks, Justin G. Longenecker, Joseph A. McKinney & Carlos W. Moore - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):281-294.
    This paper reports on the results from two studies that were conducted eight years apart with different respondents. The studies examined the role of the Mere Exposure Effect on ethical tolerance or acceptability of particular business decisions. The results from Study 1 show there is a significant difference in ethical judgment for 12 out of 16 vignettes between those who have been exposed to such situations compared to those who have not been exposed to them. In those 12 situations, those (...)
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  • Assessing the “Tone at the Top”: The Moral Reasoning of CEOs in the Automobile Industry.James Weber - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):167-182.
    Relying on an expanded view of leadership and the moral reasoning framework developed by Lawrence Kohlberg (1981), this study explores the moral reasoning of the chief executive officers at the 11 largest automobile manufacturers in the world. Using the CEO's letter to their stakeholders found in the organizations' annual social responsibility reports, the CEOs' moral reasoning is compared to other managers' moral reasoning, and the moral reasoning exhibited within the CEO group is analyzed for differences due to regional location. Contrary (...)
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  • Transition Ethics: A Comparison of Ukrainian and United States Business Professionals.Olena Vynoslavska, Joseph A. McKinney, Carlos W. Moore & Justin G. Longenecker - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):283-299.
    This article compares the ethical attitudes of Ukrainian business professionals with those of United States business professionals. A widely used survey instrument consisting of 16 hypothetical situations involving ethical dilemmas was employed to gather information on ethical attitudes in the two countries. On 13 of 16 vignettes, Ukrainian respondents demonstrated less stringent ethical attitudes than did their United States counterparts. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed, with primary emphasis on the transition from one economic system to another that is (...)
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  • Gender Differences in Double Standards.Iris Vermeir & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):281 - 295.
    The purpose of the present study is to investigate gender differences in the use of double standards in ethical judgements of questionable conduct instigated by business or consumers. We investigate if consumers are more critical towards unethical corporate versus consumer actions and if these double standards depend on the gender of the respondent. In the first study, we compared evaluations of four specific unethical actions [cfr. DePaulo, 1987, in: J. Saegert (ed.) Proceedings of the Division of Consumer Psychology (American Psychological (...)
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  • CSR Development in Post-Communist Economies: Employees' Expectations Regarding Corporate Socially Responsible Behaviour - the Case of Romania.Carmen Stoian & Rodica Milena Zaharia - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (4):380-401.
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  • CSR Development in Post-Communist Economies: Employees' Expectations Regarding Corporate Socially Responsible Behaviour – the Case of Romania.Carmen Stoian & Rodica Milena Zaharia - 2012 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 21 (4):380-401.
    Drawing on stakeholder theory and the evolutionary approach to institutions, this paper investigates the channels through which corporate social responsibility (CSR) is developed in post-communist economies by focusing on the employee background factors that shape the employees' expectations with regard to corporate socially responsible behaviour. We identify three channels through which exogenous and endogenous CSR are developed: employees with work experience in multinational enterprises (MNEs) (leading to exogenous CSR), employees with CSR knowledge (leading to exogenous CSR) and employees with experience (...)
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  • Ethno‐Cultural Considerations in Negotiation: Pretense, Deception and Lies in the Greek Workplace.Abraham Stefanidis & Moshe Banai - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (2):197-217.
    A retrospect into ethos, this study examines the impact of individualism, collectivism, ethical idealism and interpersonal trust on negotiators' attitudes toward questionable negotiation tactics in Greece. A thousand survey questionnaires were administered to Greek employees, of which 327 usable responses were collected. Our findings empirically corroborated a classification of three groups of negotiation tactics, namely, pretense, deception and lies. Individualism–collectivism and ethical idealism were found to be related, and interpersonal trust was found to be unrelated, to attitudes toward questionable negotiation (...)
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  • Ethical Decision Making in Organizations: The Role of Leadership Stress.Marcus Selart & Svein Tvedt Johansen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):129 - 143.
    Across two studies the hypotheses were tested that stressful situations affect both leadership ethical acting and leaders' recognition of ethical dilemmas. In the studies, decision makers recruited from 3 sites of a Swedish multinational civil engineering company provided personal data on stressful situations, made ethical decisions, and answered to stress-outcome questions. Stressful situations were observed to have a greater impact on ethical acting than on the recognition of ethical dilemmas. This was particularly true for situations involving punishment and lack of (...)
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