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  1. How Did You Like This Course? The Advantages and Limitations of Reaction Criteria in Ethics Education.Megan R. Turner, Logan L. Watts, Logan M. Steele, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Brett S. Torrence, E. Michelle Todd, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (6):483-496.
    Ethics courses are most commonly evaluated using reaction measures. However, little is known about the specific types of reaction data being collected and how these reaction data relate to improvements in trainee performance. Using a sample of 381 ethics training sessions, major reaction data categories were identified. Content and course satisfaction were the most frequently collected types of reaction criteria. Furthermore, content relevance and course satisfaction showed strong, positive relationships with performance criteria, whereas content satisfaction demonstrated a moderate, negative relationship. (...)
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  • A Meta-Analytic Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Delivery in Ethics Instruction: The Case for a Hybrid Approach.E. Michelle Todd, Logan L. Watts, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Brett S. Torrence, Megan R. Turner, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (6):1719-1754.
    Despite the growing body of literature on training in the responsible conduct of research, few studies have examined the effectiveness of delivery formats used in ethics courses. The present effort sought to address this gap in the literature through a meta-analytic review of 66 empirical studies, representing 106 ethics courses and 10,069 participants. The frequency and effectiveness of 67 instructional and process-based content areas were also assessed for each delivery format. Process-based contents were best delivered face-to-face, whereas contents delivered online (...)
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  • Grounds for Ambiguity: Justifiable Bases for Engaging in Questionable Research Practices.Donald F. Sacco, Mitch Brown & Samuel V. Bruton - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1321-1337.
    The current study sought to determine research scientists’ sensitivity to various justifications for engaging in behaviors typically considered to be questionable research practices by asking them to evaluate the appropriateness and ethical defensibility of each. Utilizing a within-subjects design, 107 National Institutes of Health principal investigators responded to an invitation to complete an online survey in which they read a series of research behaviors determined, in prior research, to either be ambiguous or unambiguous in their ethical defensibility. Additionally, each behavior (...)
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  • What is Working, What is Not, and What We Need to Know: A Meta-Analytic Review of Business Ethics Instruction.Kelsey E. Medeiros, Logan L. Watts, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):245-275.
    Requirements for business ethics education and organizational ethics trainings mark an important step in encouraging ethical behavior among business students and professionals. However, the lack of specificity in these guidelines as to how, what, and where business ethics should be taught has led to stark differences in approaches and content. The present effort uses meta-analytic procedures to examine the effectiveness of current approaches across organizational ethics trainings and business school courses. to provide practical suggestions for business ethics interventions and research. (...)
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  • What is Working, What is Not, and What We Need to Know: A Meta-Analytic Review of Business Ethics Instruction.Shane Connelly, Michael Mumford, Logan Steele, Tyler Mulhearn, Logan Watts & Kelsey Medeiros - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):245-275.
    Requirements for business ethics education and organizational ethics trainings mark an important step in encouraging ethical behavior among business students and professionals. However, the lack of specificity in these guidelines as to how, what, and where business ethics should be taught has led to stark differences in approaches and content. The present effort uses meta-analytic procedures to examine the effectiveness of current approaches across organizational ethics trainings and business school courses. to provide practical suggestions for business ethics interventions and research. (...)
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