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  1. ‘A Vision of Paradise Lost’: Coaching as a Grasshopper Rather Than an Ant.Michael Burke - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 49 (1):52-67.
    The work of Bernard Suits continues to be discussed in the sports philosophy field, over forty years after the publication of his brilliant book, The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia. Much of t...
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  • Utopia is Intelligible and Game-Playing is What Makes Utopia Intelligible.Deborah P. Vossen - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (2):251-265.
    Via the existential questioning outlook supplied by the Grasshopper’s three visions as relevant to the fate of humankind – oblivion, delusion, and really magnificent games – this article seeks to alleviate some of the ambiguity surrounding Bernard Suits’ provocative claim that Utopian existence is fundamentally concerned with game-playing. Specifically, after proposing an interpretation of Suits’ parable designed to enrich the logical intelligibility of his Utopian thesis, I advance the suggestion that the Grasshopper’s picture of people playing really magnificent games is (...)
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  • The Strategic Foul and Contract Law: Efficient Breach in Sports?Miroslav Imbrisevic - 2018 - Fair Play 12:69-99.
    The debate about the Strategic Foul has been rumbling on for several decades and it has predominantly been fought on moral grounds. The defenders claim that the rules of a game must be supplemented by the ‘ethos’ of the game, by its conventions or informal rules. Critics of the Strategic Foul argue that to break the rules deliberately, in order to gain an advantage, is morally wrong, spoils the game, or is a form of cheating. Rather than entering the moral (...)
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  • Rules in Games and Sports: Why a Solution to the Problem of Penalties Leads to the Rejection of Formalism as a Useful Theory About the Nature of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):49-62.
    Bernard Suits and other formalists endorse both the logical incompatibility thesis and the view that rule-breakings resulting in penalties can be a legitimate part of a game. This is what Fred D’Ag...
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  • Robert Simon and the Morality of Strategic Fouling.Miroslav Imbrisevic - 2019 - Synthesis Philosophica 34 (2):359-377.
    As sports have become more professional, winning has become more important. This emphasis on results, rather than sporting virtue and winning in style, probably explains the rising incidence of the Strategic Foul. Surprisingly, it has found some apologists among the philosophers of sport. The discussion of the Strategic Foul in the literature has produced subtle distinctions (e.g. Cesar Torres: constitutive skills versus restorative skills) as well as implausible distinctions (e.g. D’Agostino: ‘impermissible’ but ‘acceptable’ behaviour). In this paper I will review (...)
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  • Rules in Games and Sports: Why a Solution to the Problem of Penalties Leads to the Rejection of Formalism as a Useful Theory About the Nature of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):49-62.
    ABSTRACTBernard Suits and other formalists endorse both the logical incompatibility thesis and the view that rule-breakings resulting in penalties can be a legitimate part of a game. This is what Fred D’Agostino calls ‘the problem of penalties’. In this paper, I reject both Suits’ and D’Agostino’s responses to the problem and argue instead that the solution is to abandon Suits’ view that the constitutive rules of all games are alike. Whereas the logical incompatibility thesis applies to games in which players’ (...)
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  • Formalism and Strategic Fouls.Eric Moore - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):95-107.
    It is sometimes claimed that formalism and the logical incompatibility thesis together imply that fouls cannot be part of the game. Some philosophers think this proves that therefore strategic fouls are always morally wrong, but other philosophers think this result undermines formalism itself, since strategic fouls clearly are part of the game and are at least sometimes morally permissible. I show that formalism in fact does accommodate strategic fouls and that it is neutral about whether strategic fouls are morally permissible (...)
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  • The Paradoxes of Utopian Game-Playing.Deborah P. Vossen - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):315-328.
    In The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Suits maintains the following two theses: game-playing is defined as ‘activity directed towards bringing about a specific state of affairs, using only means permitted by rules, where the rules prohibit more efficient in favour of less efficient means, and where such rules are accepted just because they make possible such activity’ and ‘game playing is what makes Utopia intelligible.’ Observing that these two theses cannot be jointly maintained absent paradox, this essay explores the (...)
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  • Suits on Strategic Fouling.Miroslav Imbrišević - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (3-4):307-317.
    Given Bernard Suits’ stature in the philosophy of sport, his take on strategic fouling, surprisingly, hasn’t been given much attention in the literature. Rather than relying on a purely empirical or ‘ethos’ approach to justify the Strategic Foul he provides a mixed justification. Suits’ account combines a priori and a posteriori elements. He introduces a third kind of rule, which appears to be unlike rules of skill or constitutive rules, into his conceptual scheme. Suits claims that it is sometimes tactically (...)
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