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  1. Medicalization and Overdiagnosis: Different but Alike.Bjørn Hofmann - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):253-264.
    Medicalization is frequently defined as a process by which some non-medical aspects of human life become to be considered as medical problems. Overdiagnosis, on the other hand, is most often defined as diagnosing a biomedical condition that in the absence of testing would not cause symptoms or death in the person’s lifetime. Medicalization and overdiagnosis are related concepts as both expand the extension of the concept of disease. They are both often used normatively to critique unwarranted or contested expansion of (...)
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  • Medicalization and Epistemic Injustice.Alistair Wardrope - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):341-352.
    Many critics of medicalization express concern that the process privileges individualised, biologically grounded interpretations of medicalized phenomena, inhibiting understanding and communication of aspects of those phenomena that are less relevant to their biomedical modelling. I suggest that this line of critique views medicalization as a hermeneutical injustice—a form of epistemic injustice that prevents people having the hermeneutical resources available to interpret and communicate significant areas of their experience. Interpreting the critiques in this fashion shows they frequently fail because they: neglect (...)
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  • In Defence of Informed Consent for Health Record Research - Why Arguments From ‘Easy Rescue’, ‘No Harm’ and ‘Consent Bias’ Fail.Thomas Ploug - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-13.
    BackgroundHealth data holds great potential for improved treatments. Big data research and machine learning models have been shown to hold great promise for improved diagnostics and treatment planning. The potential is tied, however, to the availability of personal health data. In recent years, it has been argued that data from health records should be available for health research, and that individuals have a duty to make the data available for such research. A central point of debate is whether such secondary (...)
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  • En etisk diskussion af screening for kræftsygdomme.Peter Laurs Sørensen, Fía Lindenskov & Lonny Henriksen - 2009 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):59-83.
    I 2007 gennemførte forbundskansler Angela Merkel en sundhedsreform der blandt andet indebærer, at tyske borgere ikke frit kan afgøre, om de vil deltage i forebyggende programmer, da et fravalg kan medføre økonomiske konsekvenser. Hermed udvider den tyske stat sin ret til at gribe ind i borgernes liv, når det handler om sekundær forebyggelse, fx i form af screening for kræftsygdomme. Dette kan være problematisk da den bedst tilgængelige evidens viser at tre igangværende kræftscreeningsprogrammer ikke kun har gavnlige virkninger, men også (...)
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  • Ethical Issues with Colorectal Cancer Screening-a Systematic Review.Bjørn Hofmann - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (3):631-641.
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  • The Muddle of Medicalization: Pathologizing or Medicalizing?Jonathan Sholl - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):265-278.
    Medicalization appears to be an issue that is both ubiquitous and unquestionably problematic as it seems to signal at once a social and existential threat. This perception of medicalization, however, is nothing new. Since the first main writings in the 1960s and 1970s, it has consistently been used to describe inappropriate or abusive instances of medical authority. Yet, while this standard approach claims that medicalization is a growing problem, it assumes that there is simply one “medical model” and that the (...)
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  • What Should We Eat? Biopolitics, Ethics, and Nutritional Scientism.Christopher R. Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):587-599.
    Public health advocates, government agencies, and commercial organizations increasingly use nutritional science to guide food choice and diet as a way of promoting health, preventing disease, or marketing products. We argue that in many instances such references to nutritional science can be characterized as nutritional scientism. We examine three manifestations of nutritional scientism: the simplification of complex science to increase the persuasiveness of dietary guidance, superficial and honorific references to science in order to justify cultural or ideological views about food (...)
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  • Medicalization and Obstetric Care: An Analysis of Developments in Dutch Midwifery.Anke D. J. Smeenk & Henk A. M. J. ten Have - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (2):153-165.
    The Dutch system of obstetric care is often recommended for midwife-attended births, the high number of home deliveries, and the low rate of intervention during pregnancy and labour. In this contribution, the question is addressed whether processes of medicalization can be demonstrated in the Dutch midwife practice. Medicalization of pregnancy and childbirth is often criticized because it creates dependency on the medical system and infringement of the autonomy of pregnant women. It is concluded that medicalization is present in the practice (...)
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  • Omnipresent Health Checks May Result in Over-Responsibilization.Yrrah H. Stol, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Eva C. A. Asscher - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (1).
    Health checks identify disease in individuals without a medical indication. More and more checks are offered by more providers on more risk factors and diseases, so we may speak of an omnipresence of health checks. Current ethical evaluation of health checks considers checks on an individual basis only. However, omnipresent checks have effects over and above the effects of individual health checks. They might give the impression that health is entirely manageable by individual actions and strengthen the norm of individual (...)
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  • Public Health Ethics. Problems and Suggestions.Volker H. Schmidt - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (1):18-26.
    The article concerns itself with normative aspects of public health in light of recent debates. It starts out by introducing a few terminological and conceptual distinctions that set the stage for the subsequent discussion. This is followed by critical remarks on two proposals for developing an adequate public health ethics and the way that the growing health inequalities observed in much of the OECD-world are dealt with in parts of the pertinent literature. The article concludes with a cautionary note on (...)
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  • Is Nutritional Advocacy Morally Indigestible? A Critical Analysis of the Scientific and Ethical Implications of 'Healthy' Food Choice Discourse in Liberal Societies.Christopher Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):158-169.
    Medical and non-medical experts increasingly argue that individuals, whether they are diagnosed with a specific chronic disease or condition or not (and whether they are judged at minimal risk of these consequences or not), have an obligation to make ‘healthy’ food choices. We argue that this obligation is neither scientifically nor ethically justified at the level of the individual. Our intent in the article is not simply to argue against moralization of the value of prudential uses of food for nutritional (...)
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  • Public Health Ethics and Liberalism.Lubomira V. Radoilska - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (2):135-145.
    This paper defends a distinctly liberal approach to public health ethics and replies to possible objections. In particular, I look at a set of recent proposals aiming to revise and expand liberalism in light of public health's rationale and epidemiological findings. I argue that they fail to provide a sociologically informed version of liberalism. Instead, they rest on an implicit normative premise about the value of health, which I show to be invalid. I then make explicit the unobvious, republican background (...)
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  • Medicalization of Sexual Desire.Jacob Stegenga - 2021 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 17 (2):(SI5)5-34.
    Medicalisation is a social phenomenon in which conditions that were once under legal, religious, personal or other jurisdictions are brought into the domain of medical authority. Low sexual desire in females has been medicalised, pathologised as a disease, and intervened upon with a range of pharmaceuticals. There are two polarised positions on the medicalisation of low female sexual desire: I call these the mainstream view and the critical view. I assess the central arguments for both positions. Dividing the two positions (...)
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  • You Eat What You Are: Moral Dimensions of Diets Tailored to One's Genes.Franck L. B. Meijboom, Marcel F. Verweij & Frans W. A. Brom - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (6):557-568.
    Thanks to developments in genomics,dietary recommendations adapted to genetic riskprofiles of individual persons are no longerscience fiction. But what are the consequencesof these diets? An examination of possibleimpacts of genetically tailor-made diets raisesmorally relevant concerns that are analogous to(medical-ethical) considerations aboutscreening and testing. These concerns oftengive rise to applying norms for informedconsent and for the weighing of burdens andbenefits. These diets also have a broaderimpact, especially because food patterns arefull of personal, social and cultural meanings.Diets will change one's food patterns (...)
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  • Informed Consent and Registry-Based Research - the Case of the Danish Circumcision Registry.Thomas Ploug & Søren Holm - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):53.
    Research into personal health data holds great potential not only for improved treatment but also for economic growth. In these years many countries are developing policies aimed at facilitating such research often under the banner of ‘big data’. A central point of debate is whether the secondary use of health data requires informed consent if the data is anonymised. In 2013 the Danish Minister of Health established a new register collecting data about all ritual male childhood circumcisions in Denmark. The (...)
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  • Medykalizacja Kobiecego Ciała Na Przykładzie Operacji Plastycznych.Marcin Leźnicki - 2013 - Scientia et Fides 1 (1):213-20.
    Medicalization of women’s bodies as exemplified by plastic surgeries: Medicalization of human condition including the medicalization of women’s bodies through the use of cosmetic surgery is advertised by the scientists as giving numerous benefits. At the same time, however, it undoubtedly raises many ethical and legal controversies regarding the validity of medicalization itself, possible directions of its future development and the means of social control over ongoing medicalization. In the case of medicalization of women’s bodies there are questions about its (...)
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  • Participant Selection for Preventive Regenerative Medicine Trials: Ethical Challenges of Selecting Individuals at Risk: Figure 1.Sophie L. Niemansburg, Michelle G. J. L. Habets, Wouter J. A. Dhert, Johannes J. M. van Delden & Annelien L. Bredenoord - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):914-916.
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  • On the Biomedicalization of Alcoholism.Ron Berghmans, Johan de Jong, Aad Tibben & Guido de Wert - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):311-321.
    The shift in the prevailing view of alcoholism from a moral paradigm towards a biomedical paradigm is often characterized as a form of biomedicalization. We will examine and critique three reasons offered for the claim that viewing alcoholism as a disease is morally problematic. The first is that the new conceptualization of alcoholism as a chronic brain disease will lead to individualization, e.g., a too narrow focus on the individual person, excluding cultural and social dimensions of alcoholism. The second claim (...)
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  • Medicalización, prevención y cuerpos sanos: la actualidad de los aportes de Illich y Foucault.Diana Aurenque Stephan & Martín De la Ravanal - 2018 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 55:407-439.
    A partir de los análisis de Illich y Foucault se sostiene que el desarrollo de la medicina moderna ocurre paralelo a una cada vez más profunda medicalización que conlleva a importantes cambios en lo que respecta al significado del cuerpo y de la salud. Una de las expresiones actuales más paradigmáticas de estas transformaciones se observa en la medicina preventiva de alta tecnología, en cuanto ella contribuye no sólo a diluir la experiencia subjetiva de enfermedad y sanidad, sino que también (...)
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  • Can Medicalization Be Good? Situating Medicalization Within Bioethics.John Z. Sadler, Fabrice Jotterand, Simon Craddock Lee & Stephen Inrig - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):411-425.
    Medicalization has been a process articulated primarily by social scientists, historians, and cultural critics. Comparatively little is written about the role of bioethics in appraising medicalization as a social process. The authors consider what medicalization means, its definition, functions, and criteria for assessment. A series of brief case sketches illustrate how bioethics can contribute to the analysis and public policy discussion of medicalization.
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  • Imagining the Future of Photoacoustic Mammography.Simone van der Burg - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):97-110.
    How can a realistic ethical imagination about the future of a technology take shape? This article contains a reflection which is based on the experiences of an embedded ethicist in the context of biophysical research conducive to the development of photoacoustic mammography, which is intended for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer. Imagination in this context already informs the activities of the biophysical researchers, but its role is limited: biophysical future scenarios concentrate on the technological advances that photoacoustics could bring (...)
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  • Medicalization, Demedicalization and Beyond: Antisocial Behaviour and the Case of the Dutch Youth Law.Dorothee Horstkötter, Wybo Dondorp & Guido de Wert - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (3):284-294.
    Youth antisocial behaviour is frequently considered to be displayed by children and adolescents who suffer from behavioural disorders. Consequently, attempts to reduce ASB have increasingly comprised mental health interventions. Moreover, early signalling of children at risk and early prevention of behavioural problems are regarded as crucial remedies. Critical investigations of these developments, however, are in particular concerned with the consequent medicalization of society and the behaviour exhibited by infants, children and adolescents. Consequently, the new Dutch youth law even refers to (...)
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