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Descartes and the Dutch: Early Reactions to Cartesian Philosophy, 1637-1650

Southern Illinois University Press (1992)

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  1. Did Descartes Abandon Dualism? The Nature of the Union of Mind and Body.David Yandell - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):199 – 217.
  • Different Modes of Competition? Early Modern Universities and Their Rivalries.Gerhard Wiesenfeldt - 2016 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 24 (2):125-139.
    ZusammenfassungAusgehend von den Konkurrenzbegriffen Niklas Luhmanns und Georg Simmels untersucht der Artikel, inwieweit sich Konkurrenzverhältnisse an frühneuzeitlichen Universitäten in den Begriffen von Konkurrenzbedingungen moderner Ökonomie interpretieren lassen. Dieses wird anhand von Gelehrtenstreiten, dem Disputationswesen sowie Konflikten über professorale Privilegien und Universitätsgründungen diskutiert. Die zentrale These lautet, dass ökonomische Bedingungen sehr wohl eine wesentliche Rolle für Konkurrenzverhältnisse spielten, diese aber eben dem feudalistischen Wirtschaftssystem entsprachen und auf Erlangung bzw. Wahrung von Pfründen und Privilegien ausgerichtet waren. Ein moderner Konkurrenzbegriff ist demnach nur (...)
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  • When Does Truth Matter? Spinoza on the Relation Between Theology and Philosophy.Susan James - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):91-108.
    One of the aims of Spinoza's Tractatus Theologico-Politicus is to vindicate the view that philosophy and theology are separate forms of enquiry, neither of which has any authority over the other. However, many commentators have objected that this aspect of his project fails. Despite his protestations to the contrary, Spinoza implicitly gives epistemological precedence to philosophy. I argue that this objection misunderstands the nature of Spinoza's position and wrongly charges him with inconsistency. To show how he can coherently allow both (...)
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  • I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
    Does Spinoza present philosophy as the preserve of an elite, while condemning the uneducated to a false though palliative form of ‘true religion’? Some commentators have thought so, but this contribution aims to show that they are mistaken. The form of religious life that Spinoza recommends creates the political and epistemological conditions for a gradual transition to philosophical understanding, so that true religion and philosophy are in practice inseparable.
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  • The Reception of Descartes in the Seventeenth-Century Scottish Universities: Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy.Giovanni Gellera - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (3):179-201.
    In 1685, during the heyday of Scottish Cartesianism, regent Robert Lidderdale from Edinburgh University declared Cartesianism the best philosophy in support of the Reformed faith. It is commonplace that Descartes was ostracised by the Reformed, and his role in pre-Enlightenment Scottish philosophy is not yet fully acknowledged. This paper offers an introduction to Scottish Cartesianism, and argues that the philosophers of the Scottish universities warmed up to Cartesianism because they saw it as a newer, better version of their own traditional (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism.Giovanni Gellera - 2013 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):191-211.
    In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism. Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King's College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes. The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.
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  • Descartes Among the Novatores.Daniel Garber - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):1-19.
    In the Discours de la méthode, Descartes presents himself as a heroic figure, standing up against the current Aristotelian orthodoxy in philosophy, and offering something new, a mechanist physics and the metaphysics to go along with it. But Descartes was by no means the only challenger to Aristotelian natural philosophy: by Descartes’s day, there were many. Descartes was read as one of this group, generally called the novatores in Latin, and often severely criticized for their advocacy of the new. Descartes (...)
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  • Was Spinoza a Naturalist?Alexander Douglas - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (1):77-99.
    In this article I dispute the claim, made by several contemporary scholars, that Spinoza was a naturalist. ‘Naturalism’ here refers to two distinct but related positions in contemporary philosophy. The first, ontological naturalism, is the view that everything that exists possesses a certain character permitting it to be defined as natural and prohibiting it from being defined as supernatural. I argue that the only definition of ontological naturalism that could be legitimately applied to Spinoza's philosophy is so unrestrictive as to (...)
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  • Henricus Regius.Desmond Clarke - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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