Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Art of War Corpus and Chinese Just War Ethics Past and Present.Ping-Cheung Lo - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):404-446.
    The idea of “just war” is not alien to Chinese thought. The term “yi zhan” (usually translated as “just war” or “righteous war” in English) is used in Mencius, was renewed by Mao Zedong, and is still being used in China today (zhengyi zhanzheng). The best place to start exploring this Chinese idea is in the enormous Art of War corpus in premodern China, of which the Seven Military Classics is the best representative. This set of treatises served as the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Opposing Bonsais.Mario Wenning - 2021 - Kritike 15 (3):i-i.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Academic Discourse of Chinese Philosophy and 21st Century China Studies—The Case of Confucian Views on War of Revenge.Ting-Mien Lee - 2021 - Kritike 15 (3):64-80.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Public war and the requirement of legitimate authority.Yuan Yuan - 2022 - Philosophical Studies 179 (1):265-288.
    This paper offers a non-reductivist account of the requirement of legitimate authority in warfare. I first advance a distinction between private and public wars. A war is private where individuals defend their private rights with their private means. A war is public where it either aims to defend public rights or relies on public means. I argue that RLA applies to public war but not private war. A public war waged by a belligerent without legitimate authority involves a form of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Weapons Are Nothing but Ominous Instruments: The Daodejing's View on War and Peace.Ellen Y. Zhang - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):473-502.
    ABSTRACTThe Daodejing is an ancient Chinese text traditionally taken as a representative Daoist classic expressing a distinctive philosophy from the Warring States Period . This essay explicates the ethical dimensions of the DDJ paying attention to issues related to war and peace. The discussion consists of four parts: “naturalness” as an onto‐cosmological argument for a philosophy of harmony, balance, and peace; war as a sign of the disruption of the natural pattern of things initiated by the proliferation of desire; defensive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Making Peace with the Barbarians: Neo-Confucianism and the Pro-Peace Argument in 17th-Century Korea.Sungmoon Kim - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488512096396.
    This article investigates the Neo-Confucian discourse on war, premised on the “Chinese versus barbarian” binary, and its impact on the Neo-Confucian scholar-officials of 17th-century Chosŏn Korea....
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Strategic Sages and Cosmic Generals: A Daoist Perspective on the Intertextuality of the Daodejing and the Sunzi.Thomas Michael - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (1):11-31.
    This study examines the intertextuality of the Daodejing 道德經 and the Sunzi 孫子 by exploring one possible horizon that can shed light on the intellectual environment of their early circulations. A preliminary section examines the early doctrinal movements of what would later be recognized as Daoism and Militarism by triangulating them with the early doctrinal movements of what would later be recognized as Confucianism. This is followed by a consideration of the possible ways in which the early “authors” of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Xunzi on the Role of the Military in a Well-Ordered State.Eirik Lang Harris - 2019 - Journal of Military Ethics 18 (1):48-64.
    Chapter 15 of the Xunzi stands as the most comprehensive account of the early Confucian analysis of warfare. Unlike a range of other early, non-Confucian discussions on warfare, particular strategies and tactics are taken to be of secondary importance. Thus, Xunzi refuses to discuss practical military strategy without framing it within a much broader ethical, social, and political context. On his account, a well-ordered, flourishing state necessarily rests upon a particular set of rituals and social norms in which people can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Just War Theory, Legitimate Authority, and Irregular Belligerency.Jonathan Parry - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (1):175-196.
    Since its earliest incarnations, just war theory has included the requirement that war must be initiated and waged by a legitimate authority. However, while recent years have witnessed a remarkable resurgence in interest in just war theory, the authority criterion is largely absent from contemporary discussions. In this paper I aim to show that this is an oversight worth rectifying, by arguing that the authority criterion plays a much more important role within just war theorising than is commonly supposed. As (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Xunzi's Moral Analysis of War and Some of its Contemporary Implications.Aaron Stalnaker - 2012 - Journal of Military Ethics 11 (2):97-113.
    Abstract The early Ru or ?Confucian? figure Xunzi (?Master Xun,? c. 310?c. 220 BCE) gives a sophisticated analysis of war, which he develops on the basis of a larger social and political vision that he works out in considerable detail. This larger vision of human society is thoroughly normative in the sense that Xunzi both argues for the value of his ideal conception of society, and relates these moral arguments for the Confucian Dao or Way to what I take to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Classical Confucianism, Punitive Expeditions, and Humanitarian Intervention.Sumner B. Twiss & Jonathan Chan - 2012 - Journal of Military Ethics 11 (2):81-96.
    Abstract Building on the authors' previous work regarding the classical Confucian position on the legitimate use of military force as represented by Mencius and Xunzi, this paper probes their understanding of punitive expeditions undertaken against tyrants in particular ? aims, justification, preconditions, and limits. It compares this understanding with contemporary Western models of humanitarian intervention, and argues that the Confucian punitive expedition aligns most closely with the emerging ?responsibility to protect? model in Western discussions, although it also differs from the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations