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  1. The Moderating Role of Context in Determining Unethical Managerial Behavior: A Case Survey.Miska Christof, Günter K. Stahl & Matthias Fuchs - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):793-812.
    We examine the moderating role of the situational and organizational contexts in determining unethical managerial behavior, applying the case-survey methodology. On the basis of a holistic, multiple-antecedent perspective, we hypothesize that two key constructs, moral intensity and situational strength, help explain contextual moderating effects on relationships between managers’ individual characteristics and unethical behavior. Based on a quantitative analysis of 52 case studies describing occurrences of real-life unethical conduct, we find empirical support for the hypothesized contextual moderating effects of moral intensity (...)
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  • The Ethical Environment of Tax Professionals: Partner and Non-Partner Perceptions and Experiences.Donna D. Bobek, Amy M. Hageman & Robin R. Radtke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):637-654.
    This article examines perceptions of tax partners and non-partner tax practitioners regarding their CPA firms' ethical environment, as well as experiences with ethical dilemmas. Prior research emphasizes the importance of executive leadership in creating an ethical climate (e.g., Weaver et al., Acad Manage Rev 42(1): 41-57, 1999; Trevino et al., Hum Relat 56(1): 5-37, 2003; Schminke et al., Organ Dyn 36(2): 171-186, 2007). Thus, it is important to consider whether firm partners and other employees have congruent perceptions and experiences. Based (...)
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  • Cross‐National Assessment of the Effects of Income Level, Socialization Process, and Social Conditions on Employees’ Ethics.Kristine Velasquez Tuliao, Chung‐wen Chen & Ying‐Jung Yeh - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (2):333-347.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • Work Group Climate and Behavioral Responses to Psychological Contract Breach.Yimo Shen, John M. Schaubroeck, Lei Zhao & Lei Wu - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Cheating in Business: A Metaethical Perspective.Marian Eabrasu - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):519-532.
    Although the managerial practice of cheating spans complex and heterogeneous situations, most business ethics scholars consider that the very idea of cheating is indefensible on moral grounds, and quickly dismiss it as wrongdoing. This paper proposes to fine-tune this conventional moral assessment by arguing that some forms of cheating can be justified—or at least excused. To do so, it starts with a value-free definition of cheating that covers a wide diversity of situations: “breaking the rules while deliberately leading or allowing (...)
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  • Diversity Management Efforts as an Ethical Responsibility: How Employees’ Perceptions of an Organizational Integration and Learning Approach to Diversity Affect Employee Behavior.Tanja Rabl, María del Carmen Triana, Seo-Young Byun & Laura Bosch - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (3):531-550.
    This paper integrates the inclusion and organizational ethics literatures to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of an organizational integration and learning approach to diversity and two employee outcomes: organizational citizenship behavior toward the organization and interpersonal workplace deviance. Findings across two field studies from the USA and Germany show that employees’ perceptions of an organizational integration and learning approach to diversity are positively related to perceived organizational ethical virtue. Perceived organizational ethical virtue further transmits the effect of employees’ perceptions (...)
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  • The Impact of Perceived Ethical Culture of the Firm and Demographic Variables on Auditors' Ethical Evaluation and Intention to Act Decisions.Breda Sweeney, Don Arnold & Bernard Pierce - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):531 - 551.
    This study examined the impact of perceived ethical culture of the firm and selected demographic variables on auditors' ethical evaluation of, and intention to engage in, various time pressure-induced dysfunctional behaviours. Four audit cases and questionnaires were distributed to experienced pre-manager level auditors in Ireland and the U. S. The findings revealed that while perceived unethical pressure to engage in dysfunctional behaviours and unethical tone at the top were significant in forming an ethical evaluation, only perceived unethical pressure had an (...)
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  • Does the Ethical Culture of Organisations Promote Managers' Occupational Well-Being? Investigating Indirect Links Via Ethical Strain.Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Anna-Maija Lämsä, Saija Mauno & Ulla Kinnunen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):231-247.
    The present study had two major aims: first, to examine the construct validity of the Finnish 58-item Corporate Ethical Virtues scale (CEV; Kaptein in J Org Behav 29:923–947, 2008) and second, to examine whether the associations between managers’ perceptions of ethical organisational culture and their occupational well-being (emotional exhaustion and work engagement) are indirectly linked by ethical strain, i.e. the tension which arises from the difference in the ethical values of the individual and the organisation he or she works for. (...)
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  • The Role of Religiosity in Ethical Decision-Making: A Study on Islam and the Malaysian Workplace.Rahizah Sulaiman, Paul Toulson, David Brougham, Frieder Lempp & Jarrod Haar - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):297-313.
    This study investigates how Islamic religiosity affects ethical decision making. The study was conducted in the Malaysian workforce across the public and private sectors with a sample of N = 160. Five factors are tested to determine if they mediate the relationship between Islamic religiosity and ethical intention. These factors are: perceived importance of the ethical issue, moral judgment, ego strength, spiritual intention, and conscience. A parallel mediation design was chosen to test six hypotheses derived from the theoretical literature. The (...)
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  • The Role of the Applicant’s Moral Identity and the Firm’s Performance on the Ethical Signals/Organization Attraction Relationship.W. DeGrassi Sandra - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (4):923-935.
    Both the organization and recruiter provide signals to candidates that ultimately affect organizational attraction. Ethics is an important area that communicates vital information to candidates. Drawing on social identity theory, signaling theory, and person–organization fit, this study finds that ethical signals during the recruitment process do affect applicant attraction. Additionally, two important moderators, self-importance of moral identity and firm performance were examined. Using a robust laboratory study, this research found results generally consistent with the hypothesized relationships.
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  • The Role of the Applicant’s Moral Identity and the Firm’s Performance on the Ethical Signals/Organization Attraction Relationship.Sandra W. DeGrassi - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (4):923-935.
    Both the organization and recruiter provide signals to candidates that ultimately affect organizational attraction. Ethics is an important area that communicates vital information to candidates. Drawing on social identity theory, signaling theory, and person–organization fit, this study finds that ethical signals during the recruitment process do affect applicant attraction. Additionally, two important moderators, self-importance of moral identity and firm performance were examined. Using a robust laboratory study, this research found results generally consistent with the hypothesized relationships.
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  • The Antecedents of Ethical Climates in the Spanish Business Higher Education Institutions.M. Edurne Aldazabal, Marcela Espinosa-Pike & Ana M. Martín-Arroyuelo - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (4):343-363.
    Ethical climate in organisations has been studied widely and its influence on ethical behaviour has been documented. However, little is known about the ethical climate at university context and about its antecedents. Universities are social change institutions and their ethical climate could influence the ethical behaviour of future economic, social and political leaders. The current study analyses the perceived ethical climate in Business Studies Higher Education Institutions in Spain and whether university’s ownership, size and signing up for international initiatives influence (...)
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  • Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159 - 172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees’ ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
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  • Influence of Ethical Ideology on Job Stress.Abhishek Shukla & Rajeev Srivastava - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):233-254.
    The relationship between ethical ideology and job stress appears to be complex. This study is based on a model presented by Forsyth, showing two dimensions that play an important role in ethical evaluation and behavior. Based on a survey of 561 employees of hotel industry in India, ethical ideologies were found to be negatively associated with job stress. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlations and multiple regressions. The result showed that relativism is negatively correlated with job stress. Further, it (...)
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  • Organizational Ethical Virtues of Innovativeness.Elina Riivari & Anna-Maija Lämsä - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):223-240.
    This study participates in the discussion of the ethical culture of organizations by deepening the knowledge and understanding of the meaning of organizational ethical virtues in organizational innovativeness. The aim in this study was to explore how an organization’s ethical culture and, more specifically, organization’s ethical virtues support organizational innovativeness. The ethical culture of an organization is defined as the virtuousness of an organization. Organizational innovativeness is conceptualized as an organization’s behavioral propensity to produce innovative products and services. The empirical (...)
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  • There Are No Codes, Only Interpretations. Practical Wisdom and Hermeneutics in Monastic Organizations.Guillaume Mercier & Ghislain Deslandes - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (4):781-794.
    Corporate codes of ethics, which have spread in the last decades, have shown a limited ability to foster ethical behaviors. For instance, they have been criticized for relying too much on formal compliance, rather than taking into account sufficiently agents and their moral development, or promoting self-reflexive behaviors. We aim here at showing that a code of ethics in fact has meaning and enables ethical progress when it is interpreted and appropriated with practical wisdom. We explore a model that represents (...)
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  • Why Do Managers Leave Their Organization? Investigating the Role of Ethical Organizational Culture in Managerial Turnover.Maiju Kangas, Muel Kaptein, Mari Huhtala, Anna-Maija Lämsä, Pia Pihlajasaari & Taru Feldt - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):707-723.
    The aim of the present longitudinal study was to quantitatively examine whether an ethical organizational culture predicts turnover among managers. To complement the quantitative results, a further important aim was to examine the self-reported reasons behind manager turnover, and the associations of ethical organizational culture with these reasons. The participants were Finnish managers working in technical and commercial fields. Logistic regression analyses indicated that, of the eight virtues investigated, congruency of supervisors, congruency of senior management, discussability, and sanctionability were negatively (...)
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  • Just the Right Amount of Ethics Inspires Creativity: A Cross-Level Investigation of Ethical Leadership, Intrinsic Motivation, and Employee Creativity.Jie Feng, Yucheng Zhang, Xinmei Liu, Long Zhang & Xiao Han - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):645-658.
    Based on ideology-infused psychological contract theory and cognitive evaluation theory, this study investigated the curvilinear relationship between ethical leadership and employee creativity. A curvilinear mediation model was proposed to explain the impact of ethical leadership on creativity, using employee intrinsic motivation as the mediator. Applying a two wave sampling design that consist 258 employees and their leaders, we found that employee creativity improved as ethical leadership increased from low to moderate levels. However, the employee creativity improvement was attenuated when ethical (...)
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  • Characteristics and Trends in Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior Research in Business and Management: A Bibliometric Analysis.Zhihong Li - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Unethical pro-organizational behavior is one of the core factors that affect organizational development. Although enterprises and researchers have done a lot of work, a quantitative and systematic assessment of unethical pro-organizational behavior research is still lacking, this review conducts a bibliometric analysis to describe the characteristics and trends of unethical pro-organizational behavior research in business and management, such as publication trend analysis, co-citation analysis, keywords co-occurrence analysis, and citation burst analysis. The results show that 89 articles and 4,523 references from (...)
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  • The Role of Individual Variables, Organizational Variables and Moral Intensity Dimensions in Libyan Management Accountants’ Ethical Decision Making.Ahmed Musbah, Christopher J. Cowton & David Tyfa - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):335-358.
    This study investigates the association of a broad set of variables with the ethical decision making of management accountants in Libya. Adopting a cross-sectional methodology, a questionnaire including four different ethical scenarios was used to gather data from 229 participants. For each scenario, ethical decision making was examined in terms of the recognition, judgment and intention stages of Rest’s model. A significant relationship was found between ethical recognition and ethical judgment and also between ethical judgment and ethical intention, but ethical (...)
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  • Ethical Context and Ethical Decision Making: Examination of an Alternative Statistical Approach for Identifying Variable Relationships.Sean Valentine, Seong-Hyun Nam, David Hollingworth & Callie Hall - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):509-526.
    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational ethical context and the individual ethical decision-making process. In addition, a new statistical approach combining cluster and discriminant analyses was developed to overcome violations of regression assumptions, which are commonly not identified and/or ignored in behavioral and psychological research. Using regressions and this new alternative method, the findings indicated that ethical context does indeed influence the various components of ethical reasoning. However, social desirability was the strongest predictor of (...)
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  • Does an Ethical Work Context Generate Internal Social Capital?David Pastoriza, Miguel A. Arino, Joan E. Ricart & Miguel A. Canela - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (1):77-92.
    Ethics has recently gained importance in the debate over social capital creation. The goal of this study is to empirically examine the ethical work context of the firm as an antecedent of the firm’s internal social capital. We build on person–situation interactionist theory to argue that individuals can learn standards of appropriate behavior induced by the ethical work context in which they are embedded. By creating an ethical work context, managers can facilitate the process through which employees learn to feel (...)
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  • The Moderating Effect of Perceived Organizational Ethical Context on Employees’ Ethical Issue Recognition and Ethical Judgments.David Hollingworth & Sean Valentine - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):457-466.
    When investigating the impact of organizational ethical context on individual ethical decision-making, past work has reported mixed results, with some studies indicating that a strong ethical work environment is associated with increased ethical reasoning, and other studies indicating that such an environment has little to no influence on the way ethical issues are addressed. Given these contradictory findings, we utilize multiple theoretical perspectives to assess the degree to which employees’ perceptions of ethical values, ethical culture, and corporate social responsibility moderate (...)
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  • Exploring the Socio-Moral Climate in Organizations: An Empirical Examination of Determinants, Consequences, and Mediating Mechanisms.Armin Pircher Verdorfer, Brigitte Steinheider & David Burkus - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):233-248.
    During the last decade, an increasing amount of research has focused on the ethical context in organizations. Among the recent approaches in this area is the construct of socio-moral climate, which adopts a developmental perspective and refers to specific elements of organizational climate that include communication, cooperation, and how organizations handle conflict. In this article, we present the results of three empirical studies, shedding light on the nomological network of SMC. Whereas the first study introduces a short SMC measure, the (...)
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  • The Dark Side of Buyer Power: Supplier Exploitation and the Role of Ethical Climates.Martin C. Schleper, Constantin Blome & David A. Wuttke - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):97-114.
    Media increasingly accuse firms of exploiting suppliers, and these allegations often result in lurid headlines that threaten the reputations and therefore business successes of these firms. Neither has the phenomenon of supplier exploitation been investigated from a rigorous, ethical standpoint, nor have answers been provided regarding why some firms pursue exploitative approaches. By systemically contrasting economic liberalism and just prices as two divergent perspectives on supplier exploitation, we introduce a distinction of common business practice and unethical supplier exploitation. Since supplier (...)
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  • The Impact of Ethical Climate Types on Nurses’ Behaviors in Bosnia and Herzegovina.M. Sait Dinc & Alma Huric - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (8):922-935.
    Background:The performance of nurses has become vital in hospitals. Some studies have suggested that nurses’ perceptions of the ethical climate in their hospitals are related to higher job satisfaction and organizational commitment and in turn lessen the issue of nursing shortage.Hypothesis: The ethical climate types “caring,” “independent,” “law and code,” and “rules” have a significant positive impact on overall job satisfaction. The ethical climate types and overall job satisfaction have significant positive influences on normative and affective and significant negative influences (...)
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  • Sharing Strategic Decisions: CEO Humility, TMT Decentralization, and Ethical Culture.Sebastian Cortes-Mejia, Andres Felipe Cortes & Pol Herrmann - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):241-260.
    Humility is increasingly recognized as an essential attribute for individuals at top management levels to build successful organizations. However, research on CEO humility has focused on how humble chief executive officers shape collective perceptions through their interactions and behaviors with other organizational members while overlooking CEOs’ critical role in making strategic decisions. We address this unexplored aspect of CEO humility by proposing that humble CEOs influence decision-making decentralization at the top management team and subsequently promote an organizational ethical culture. Using (...)
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  • Creating an Ethical Work Context: A Pathway to Generate Social Capital in the Firm.David Pastoriza, Miguel A. Ariño & Joan E. Ricart - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):477-489.
    There is a need for further research to understand how social capital in the workplace can be promoted. This article studies the generation of social capital from a comprehensive perspective that integrates ethics and general management. We propose the concept of “ethical work context” as an influential antecedent of the social capital in the firm. The ethical work context, which is aligned with the “humanizing culture” approach proposed by Melé ( Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1), 3–14, 2003a ), allows (...)
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  • Ethical Climates and the Ethical Dimension of Decision Making.David J. Fritzsche - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):125 - 140.
    Victor and Cullen (1987, 1988) developed a typology of ethical climates based upon the level of moral development of the work group (egoism, benevolence and principled a la Kohlberg, 1981) and the locus of analysis utilized in reaching decisions (individual, local, cosmopolitan). Building on this typology, data were obtained from a high technology company for the purpose of empirically extending the examination of the number of ethical climates that exist and portraying the relationship between ethical climates and the ethical dimension (...)
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  • Toward a Model of Cross-Cultural Business Ethics: The Impact of Individualism and Collectivism on the Ethical Decision-Making Process.Bryan W. Husted & David B. Allen - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):293-305.
    In this paper, we explore the impact of individualism and collectivism on three basic aspects of ethical decision making - the perception of moral problems, moral reasoning, and behavior. We argue that the inclusion of business practices within the moral domain by the individual depends partly upon individualism and collectivism. We also propose a pluralistic approach to post-conventional moral judgment that includes developmental paths appropriate for individualist and collectivist cultures. Finally, we argue that the link between moral judgment and behavior (...)
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  • Double-Edged Effects of Creative Personality on Moral Disengagement and Unethical Behaviors: Dual Motivational Mechanisms and a Situational Contingency.Xin Liu, Byron Y. Lee, Tae-Yeol Kim, Yaping Gong & Xiaoming Zheng - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Research shows that the effects of creative personality on moral disengagement and unethical behaviors are mixed. To reconcile the disparate findings, we draw on interdependence theory to unravel how and when creative personality is related to moral disengagement through countervailing pathways. Specifically, we propose competitive motivation and prosocial motivation as two distinct mechanisms that explain the double-edged effects of creative personality on moral disengagement and subsequent unethical behaviors. Furthermore, we hypothesize a cross-level moderating effect of competitive climate on the relationships (...)
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  • An Exploratory Investigation of the Effect of Ethical Culture in Activating Moral Imagination.Dennis Moberg & David F. Caldwell - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (2):193-204.
    Moral imagination is a process that involves a thorough consideration of the ethical elements of a decision. We sought to explore what might distinguish moral imagination from other ethical approaches within a complex business simulation. Using a three-component model of moral imagination, we sought to discover whether organization cultures with a salient ethics theme activate moral imagination. Finding an effect, we sought an answer to whether some individuals were more prone to being influenced in this way by ethical cultures. We (...)
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  • Character-Infused Ethical Decision Making.Brenda Nguyen & Mary Crossan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):171-191.
    Despite a growing body of research by management scholars to understand and explain failures in ethical decision making, misconduct prevails. Scholars have identified character, founded in virtue ethics, as an important perspective that can help to address the gap in organizational misconduct. While character has been offered as a valid perspective in EDM, current theorizing on how it applies to EDM has not been well developed. We thus integrate character, founded in virtue ethics, into Rest’s EDM model to reveal how (...)
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  • My Company Cares About My Success…I Think: Clarifying Why and When a Firm’s Ethical Reputation Impacts Employees’ Subjective Career Success.Darryl B. Rice, Regina M. Taylor, Yiding Wang, Sijing Wei & Valentina Ge - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    The value of a company’s ethical reputation has become a focal point for management researchers. We seek to join this conversation and extend the research centered on a firm’s ethical reputation. We accomplish this by shifting our focus away from its impact on external stakeholders to its impact on internal stakeholders. To this end, we rely on signaling theory to explain why a firm’s ethical reputation matters to its employees in an effort to bridge the macro–micro research gap. Across two (...)
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  • Linking Ethical Leadership with Firm Performance: A Multi-Dimensional Perspective.Dan Wang, Taiwen Feng & Alan Lawton - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (1):95-109.
    Despite the importance of ethical leadership, the impacts of its different facets on firm-level performance are unclear. Drawing on the resource-based view of the firm and the group engagement model, we propose that ethical leadership consisting of leader humane orientation, leader responsibility and sustainability orientation and leader moderation orientation are beneficial to firm performance, and leader justice orientation plays moderating roles. We empirically tested this theoretical framework employing multi-source survey data collected from 264 Chinese firms. The findings reveal that both (...)
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  • The Masculinisation of Ethical Leadership Dis/Embodiment.Helena Liu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):263-278.
    This article argues that while ethical leadership in mainstream theorising is assumed to be a cognitive exercise, leaders’ bodies in fact play a significant role in the social construction of ethical leadership. Their bodies become particularly potent when leaders are depicted via the interplay between visual and verbal modes in the media. In order to extend current understandings of ethical leadership, this study employs a discourse analytic approach to examine how visual and verbal devices convey ethical leadership for two of (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Leadership, and Trust Propensity: A Multi-Experience Model of Perceived Ethical Climate.S. Duane Hansen, Benjamin B. Dunford, Bradley J. Alge & Christine L. Jackson - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (4):649-662.
    Existing research on the formation of employee ethical climate perceptions focuses mainly on organization characteristics as antecedents, and although other constructs have been considered, these constructs have typically been studied in isolation. Thus, our understanding of the context in which ethical climate perceptions develop is incomplete. To address this limitation, we build upon the work of Rupp to develop and test a multi-experience model of ethical climate which links aspects of the corporate social responsibility, ethics, justice, and trust literatures and (...)
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  • The Virtuous Influence of Ethical Leadership Behavior: Evidence From the Field.Mitchell J. Neubert, Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar, James A. Roberts & Lawrence B. Chonko - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):157-170.
    This study examines a moderated/mediated model of ethical leadership on follower job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. We proposed that managers have the potential to be agents of virtue or vice within organizations. Specifically, through ethical leadership behavior we argued that managers can virtuously influence perceptions of ethical climate, which in turn will positively impact organizational members' flourishing as measured by job satisfaction and affective commitment to the organization. We also hypothesized that perceptions of interactional justice would moderate the ethical (...)
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  • Influences Upon Organizational Ethical Subclimates: A Replication Study of a Single Firm at Two Points in Time. [REVIEW]James Weber & Julie E. Seger - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):69 - 84.
    This research replicates Weber's 1995 study of a large financial services firm that found that ethical subclimates exist within multi-departmental organizations, are influenced by the function of the department and the stakeholders served, and are relatively stable over time. Relying upon theoretical models developed by Thompson (1967) and Victor and Cullen (1998), hypotheses are developed that predict the ethical subclimate decision-making dimensions and type for diverse departments within a large steel manufacturing firm and that these ethical subclimate types will be (...)
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  • Leader and Organizational Behavioral Integrity and Follower Behavioral Outcomes: The Role of Identification Processes.Ziya Ete, Olga Epitropaki, Qin Zhou & Les Graham - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):741-760.
    This paper investigates the concept of behavioral integrity from three important foci in organizational settings: i.e., leader, organization, and follower. Drawing from theories of behavioral integrity, social learning, and social identity, we examine the effects of leader and organizational behavioral integrity on follower behavioral integrity and organizational citizenship behavior via follower identification with leader and with organization, respectively. To test our hypotheses, we used data from three studies. Studies 1 and 2 were online experiments in which behavioral integrity was manipulated (...)
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  • Giving as Good as They Get? Organization and Employee Expectations of Ethical Business Practice.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (1):47-70.
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  • Giving as Good as They Get? Organization and Employee Expectations of Ethical Business Practice.John Simmons Chris Mason - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (1):47-70.
    Corporate malpractice and malfeasance on an unprecedented scale have brought ethical issues to the fore and accentuated demands from activists, governments, and the public for greater corporate social responsibility . The predominant response of researchers and policymakers has been to focus on the external impact of business operations and the merits of regulation or persuasion in achieving more responsible practice in these areas. In this article, we focus on a less well explored aspect of CSR, namely the evaluation of an (...)
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  • Ordinary Aristocrats: The Discursive Construction of Philanthropists as Ethical Leaders.Helena Liu & Christopher Baker - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (2):261-277.
    Philanthropic giving among leaders is often assumed to be an expression of ethical leadership in both academic and media discourses; however, this assumption can overlook the ways in which philanthropy produces and is underpinned by inequality. In order to extend current understandings of ethical leadership, this study employs a critical discourse analytic approach to examine how the link between philanthropy and ethical forms of leadership is verbally and visually constructed in the media. Based on the analysis, the article demonstrates how (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Commitment.Jane Collier & Rafael Esteban - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (1):19–33.
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  • Good Computing: A Pedagogically Focused Model of Virtue in the Practice of Computing.Chuck Huff, Laura Barnard & William Frey - 2008 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 6 (4):284-316.
    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to present a four component model of ethical behavior that integrates literature in moral psychology, computing ethics, and virtue ethics as informed by research on moral exemplars in computing. This is part 2 of a two part contribution, part 1 having appeared in Vol. 6 No. 3.Design/methodology/approachThis psychologically based and philosophically informed model argues that moral action is grounded in relatively stable personality characteristics, guided by integration of morality into the self‐system, shaped by the (...)
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  • Organizational Change, Normative Control Deinstitutionalization, and Corruption.Kelly D. Martin, Jean L. Johnson & John B. Cullen - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):105-130.
    Despite widespread attention to corruption and organizational change in the literature, to our knowledge, no research has attempted to understand the linkages between these two powerful organizational phenomena. Accordingly, we draw on major theories in ethics, sociology, and management to develop a theoretical framework for understanding how organizational change can sometimes generate corruption. We extend anomie theory and ethical climate theory to articulate the deinstitutionalization of the normative control system and argue that, through this deinstitutionalization, organizations have the potential to (...)
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  • Measuring Ethical Organizational Culture: Validation of the Spanish Version of the Shortened Corporate Ethical Virtues Model.Juliana Toro-Arias, Pablo Ruiz-Palomino & María del Pilar Rodríguez-Córdoba - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):551-574.
    A key issue in the business ethics field is the design of effective measures for assessing the ethical culture of organizations. The Corporate Ethical Virtues Model, developed by Kaptein in 2008, is an instrument for measuring ethical culture, and has been applied, adapted and validated in different contexts. In 2013, DeBode, Armenakis, Field and Walker developed the CEV–S, a shortened version of the original scale. Both the CEV and CEV–S assess eight dimensions based on corporate ethical virtues: clarity, congruency of (...)
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  • Toward an Ethical Theory of Organizing.Naveed Yazdani & Hasan S. Murad - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):399-417.
    Current organizations are underpinned by utilitarian ethics of Modernity. Pure economic motive driven organizations detach themselves from larger societal interest. Rising number of corporate scandals and intraorganizational income inequalities are breeding similar trends in society at large. Current organizations base their competitive advantage on resources and capabilities which boils down to economic supremacy at all cost whether it is named I/o or RBV of the firm. This theoretical article posits Ethics-based Trust as the main competency and capability for attaining sustained (...)
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  • The Methodology in Empirical Sales Ethics Research: 1980–2010.Nicholas McClaren - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):121-147.
    The study examines the research methodology of more than 200 empirical investigations of ethics in personal selling and sales management between 1980 and 2010. The review discusses the sources and authorship of the sales ethics research. To better understand the drivers of empirical sales ethics research, the foundations used in business, marketing, and sales ethics are compared. The use of hypotheses, operationalization, measurement, population and sampling decisions, research design, and statistical analysis techniques were examined as part of theory development and (...)
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  • Personal Attributes, Organizational Conditions, and Ethical Attitudes: A Social Cognitive Approach.Dirk Holtbrügge, Anastasia Baron & Carina B. Friedmann - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (3):264-281.
    This paper investigates the impact of personal attributes and organizational conditions on attitudes toward corporate misdeeds. On the basis of social cognitive theory, we develop hypotheses that are tested against data collected from 215 German employees using an online survey. Our findings suggest that personal attributes have a much greater impact on ethical attitudes than organizational conditions. Further, a moderating effect of control-oriented culture on the relationship between personality traits and attitudes toward corporate misdeeds is found. We derive implications for (...)
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