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  1. Ugliness Is in the Gut of the Beholder.Ryan P. Doran - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    I offer the first sustained defence of the claim that ugliness is constituted by the disposition to disgust. I advance three main lines of argument in support of this thesis. First, ugliness and disgustingness tend to lie in the same kinds of things and properties (the argument from ostensions). Second, the thesis is better placed than all existing accounts to accommodate the following facts: ugliness is narrowly and systematically distributed in a heterogenous set of things, ugliness is sometimes enjoyed, and (...)
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  • The Coevolution of Secrecy and Stigmatization.Jared Piazza & Jesse M. Bering - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (3):290-308.
    We propose a coevolutionary model of secrecy and stigmatization. According to this model, secrecy functions to conceal potential fitness costs detected in oneself or one’s genetic kin. In three studies, we found that the content of participants’ distressing secrets overlapped significantly with three domains of social information that were important for inclusive fitness and served as cues for discriminating between rewarding and unrewarding interaction partners: health, mating, and social-exchange behavior. These findings support the notion that secrecy functions primarily as a (...)
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  • Chimera, Spandrel, or Adaptation.Ellen Dissanayake - 1995 - Human Nature 6 (2):99-117.
    In every known human society, some kind—usually many kinds—of art is practiced, frequently with much vigor and pleasure, so that one could at least hypothesize that “artifying” or “artification” is a characteristic behavior of our species. Yet human ethologists and sociobiologists have been conspicuously unforthcoming about this observably widespread and valued practice, for a number of stated and unstated reasons. The present essay is a position paper that offers an overview and analysis of conceptual issues and problems inherent in viewing (...)
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  • Raising Darwin’s Consciousness.Sarah Blaffer Hrdy - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (1):1-49.
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  • The Uncanny Advantage of Using Androids in Cognitive and Social Science Research.Karl F. MacDorman & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2006 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 7 (3):297-337.
    The development of robots that closely resemble human beings can contribute to cognitive research. An android provides an experimental apparatus that has the potential to be controlled more precisely than any human actor. However, preliminary results indicate that only very humanlike devices can elicit the broad range of responses that people typically direct toward each other. Conversely, to build androids capable of emulating human behavior, it is necessary to investigate social activity in detail and to develop models of the cognitive (...)
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  • Archaeology and Cognitive Evolution.Thomas Wynn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):389-402.
    Archaeology can provide two bodies of information relevant to the understanding of the evolution of human cognition – the timing of developments, and the evolutionary context of these developments. The challenge is methodological. Archaeology must document attributes that have direct implications for underlying cognitive mechanisms. One example of such a cognitive archaeology is found in spatial cognition. The archaeological record documents an evolutionary sequence that begins with ape-equivalent spatial abilities 2.5 million years ago and ends with the appearance of modern (...)
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  • The Causal Role of Consciousness: A Conceptual Addendum to Human Evolutionary Psychology.Jesse M. Bering & Todd K. Shackelford - 2004 - Review of General Psychology 8 (4):227-248.
  • Hairstyle as an Adaptive Means of Displaying Phenotypic Quality.Norbert Mesko & Tamas Bereczkei - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (3):251-270.
    Although facial features that are considered beautiful have been investigated across cultures using the framework of sexual selection theory, the effects of head hair on esthetic evaluations have rarely been examined from an evolutionary perspective. In the present study the effects of six hair-styles (short, medium-length, long, disheveled, knot [hair bun], unkempt) on female facial attractiveness were examined in four dimensions (femininity, youth, health, sexiness) relative to faces without visible head hair (“basic face”). Three evolutionary hypotheses were tested (covering hypothesis, (...)
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  • The Formation of Status Hierarchies in Leaderless Groups.Lorne Campbell, Jeffry A. Simpson, Mark Stewart & John G. Manning - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (3):345-362.
    Two studies examined the link between social dominance and male waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). Groups of four men interacted in a leaderless group discussion. In both studies, men with higher WHRs (associated with current and long-term health status) were rated by other group members as behaving more leader-like when an observer was present, and rated themselves as being more assertive. In Study 2, men with higher WHRs were rated by independent observers as behaving more dominantly, but only when the evaluator was (...)
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  • Just so Stories and Inference to the Best Explanation in Evolutionary Psychology.Harmon R. Holcomb - 1996 - Minds and Machines 6 (4):525-540.
    Evolutionary psychology is a science in the making, working toward the goal of showing how psychological adaptation underlies much human behavior. The knee-jerk reaction that sociobiology is unscientific because it tells just-so stories has become a common charge against evolutionary psychology as well. My main positive thesis is that inference to the best explanation is a proper method for evolutionary analyses, and it supplies a new perspective on the issues raised in Schlinger's (1996) just-so story critique. My main negative thesis (...)
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  • Faces with Light Makeup Are Better Recognized Than Faces with Heavy Makeup.Keiko Tagai, Hitomi Ohtaka & Hiroshi Nittono - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Facial Shape Analysis Identifies Valid Cues to Aspects of Physiological Health in Caucasian, Asian, and African Populations.Ian D. Stephen, Vivian Hiew, Vinet Coetzee, Bernard P. Tiddeman & David I. Perrett - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Taking the Perfect Selfie: Investigating the Impact of Perspective on the Perception of Higher Cognitive Variables.Tobias M. Schneider & Claus-Christian Carbon - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Differences in the Visual Perception of Symmetric Patterns in Orangutans and Two Human Cultural Groups: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study.Cordelia Mühlenbeck, Katja Liebal, Carla Pritsch & Thomas Jacobsen - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • Facial Adiposity, Attractiveness, and Health: A Review.Stefan de Jager, Nicoleen Coetzee & Vinet Coetzee - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Relationship Between Observers' Self-Attractiveness and Preference for Physical Dimorphism: A Meta-Analysis.Lijun Chen, Xiaoliu Jiang, Huiyong Fan, Ying Yang & Zhihong Ren - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Explaining Financial and Prosocial Biases in Favor of Attractive People: Interdisciplinary Perspectives From Economics, Social Psychology, and Evolutionary Psychology.Dario Maestripieri, Andrea Henry & Nora Nickels - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • Intuitions About Mathematical Beauty: A Case Study in the Aesthetic Experience of Ideas.Samuel G. B. Johnson & Stefan Steinerberger - 2019 - Cognition 189:242-259.
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  • Consequences of Beauty: Effects of Rater Sex and Sexual Orientation on the Visual Exploration and Evaluation of Attractiveness in Real World Scenes.Aleksandra Mitrovic, Pablo P. L. Tinio & Helmut Leder - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • Facial Attractiveness.Randy Thornhill & Steven W. Gangestad - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (12):452-460.
  • Mate Choice Turns Cognitive.Geoffrey F. Miller & Peter M. Todd - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (5):190-198.
  • Life History of Female Preferences for Male Faces.Krzysztof Kościński - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (4):416-438.
    Although scientific interest in facial attractiveness has developed substantially in recent years, few studies have contributed to our understanding of the ontogeny of facial preferences. In this study, attractiveness of 30 male faces was evaluated by four female groups: girls at puberty, nonpregnant and pregnant young women, and middle-aged women. The main findings are as follows: (1) Preference for sexy-looking faces was strongest in young, nonpregnant women. (2) Biologically more mature girls displayed more adultlike preferences. (3) The intragroup consistency for (...)
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  • Facial Attractiveness, Symmetry, and Physical Fitness in Young Women.Johannes Hönekopp, Tobias Bartholomé & Gregor Jansen - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (2):147-167.
    This study explores the evolutionary-based hypothesis that facial attractiveness (a guiding force in mate selection) is a cue for physical fitness (presumably an important contributor to mate value in ancestral times). Since fluctuating asymmetry, a measure of developmental stability, is known to be a valid cue for fitness in several biological domains, we scrutinized facial asymmetry as a potential mediator between attractiveness and fitness. In our sample of young women, facial beauty indeed indicated physical fitness. The relationships that pertained to (...)
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  • Does Early Psychosocial Stress Affect Mate Choice?Nicole Koehler & James S. Chisholm - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (1):52-66.
    Early psychosocial stress (e.g., parental divorce, abuse) is conjectured to place individuals on a developmental trajectory leading to earlier initiation of sexual activity, earlier reproduction, and having more sex partners than those with less early psychosocial stress. But does it also affect an individual’s mate choice? The present study examined whether early psychosocial stress affects preferences and dislikes for opposite-sex faces varying in masculinity/femininity, a putative indicator of mate quality, in premenopausal women (58 with a natural cycle, 53 pill-users) and (...)
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  • The Effect of Infant Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Facial Features on Adoption Preference.Katherine L. Waller, Anthony Volk & Vernon L. Quinsey - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (1):101-117.
    Infant facial characteristics may affect discriminative parental solicitude because they convey information about the health of the offspring. We examined the effect of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) infant facial characteristics on hypothetical adoption preferences, ratings of attractiveness, and ratings of health. As expected, potential parents were more likely to adopt “normal” infants, and they rated the FAS infants as less attractive and less healthy. Cuteness/attractiveness was the best predictor of adoption likelihood.
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