Switch to: References

Citations of:

Time-scale dynamics and the development of an embodied cognition

In Tim van Gelder & Robert Port (eds.), Mind as Motion: Explorations in the Dynamics of Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 69--100 (1995)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Questions For The Dynamicist: The Use of Dynamical Systems Theory in the Philosophy of Cognition.Marco Van Leeuwen - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (3):271-333.
    The concepts and powerful mathematical tools of Dynamical Systems Theory (DST) yield illuminating methods of studying cognitive processes, and are even claimed by some to enable us to bridge the notorious explanatory gap separating mind and matter. This article includes an analysis of some of the conceptual and empirical progress Dynamical Systems Theory is claimed to accomodate. While sympathetic to the dynamicist program in principle, this article will attempt to formulate a series of problems the proponents of the approach in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Abduction, Reason and Science: Processes of Discovery and Explanation.L. Magnani - 2001 - New York, NY, USA: Springer Science & Business Media.
    This book ties together the concerns of philosophers of science and AI researchers, showing for example the connections between scientific thinking and medical expert systems. It lays out a useful general framework for discussion of a variety of kinds of abduction. It develops important ideas about aspects of abductive reasoning that have been relatively neglected in cognitive science, including the use of visual and temporal representations and the role of abduction in the withdrawal of hypotheses.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • The Dynamical Hypothesis in Cognitive Science.Tim van Gelder - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):615-28.
    According to the dominant computational approach in cognitive science, cognitive agents are digital computers; according to the alternative approach, they are dynamical systems. This target article attempts to articulate and support the dynamical hypothesis. The dynamical hypothesis has two major components: the nature hypothesis (cognitive agents are dynamical systems) and the knowledge hypothesis (cognitive agents can be understood dynamically). A wide range of objections to this hypothesis can be rebutted. The conclusion is that cognitive systems may well be dynamical systems, (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   191 citations  
  • Eating Soup with Chopsticks: Dogmas, Difficulties and Alternatives in the Study of Conscious Experience.Rafael E. Núñez - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (2):143-166.
    The recently celebrated division into ‘easy’ and ‘hard’ problems of consciousness is unfortunate and misleading. Built on functionalist grounds, it carves up the subject matter by declaring that the most elusive parts need a fundamentally and intrinsically different solution. What we have, rather, are ‘difficult’ problems of conscious experience, but problems that are not difficult per se. Their difficulty is relative, among other things, to the kind of solution one is looking for and the tools used to accomplish the task. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Consciousness, Context, and Know-How.Charles Wallis - 2008 - Synthese 160 (1):123 - 153.
    In this paper I criticize the most significant recent examples of the practical knowledge analysis of knowledge-how in the philosophical literature: David Carr [1979, Mind, 88, 394–409; 1981a, American Philosophical Quarterly, 18, 53–61; 1981b, Journal of Philosophy of Education, 15(1), 87–96] and Stanley & Williamson [2001, Journal of Philosophy, 98(8), 411–444]. I stress the importance of know-how in our contemporary understanding of the mind, and offer the beginnings of a treatment of know-how capable of providing insight in to the use (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Self-Directed Agents.Wayne David Christensen & Cliff A. Hooker - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (Supplement):19-52.
    Wayne D. Christensen and Cliff A. Hooker.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Embodiment in Cognitive Systems: On the Mutual Dependence of Cognition & Robotics.David Vernon, Giorgio Metta & Giulio Sandini - unknown
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Do Double Dissociations Prove?Guy C. Orden, Bruce F. Pennington & Gregory O. Stone - 2001 - Cognitive Science 25 (1):111-172.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Directions in Connectionist Research: Tractable Computations Without Syntactically Structured Representations.Jonathan Waskan & William Bechtel - 1997 - Metaphilosophy 28 (1‐2):31-62.
    Figure 1: A pr ototyp ical exa mple of a three-layer feed forward network, used by Plunkett and M archm an (1 991 ) to simulate learning the past-tense of En glish verbs. The inpu t units encode representations of the three phonemes of the present tense of the artificial words used in this simulation. Th e netwo rk is trained to produce a representation of the phonemes employed in the past tense form and the suffix (/d/, /ed/, or /t/) (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Representations and Cognitive Explanations: Assessing the Dynamicist Challenge in Cognitive Science.William Bechtel - 1998 - Cognitive Science 22 (3):295-317.
    Advocates of dynamical systems theory (DST) sometimes employ revolutionary rhetoric. In an attempt to clarify how DST models differ from others in cognitive science, I focus on two issues raised by DST: the role for representations in mental models and the conception of explanation invoked. Two features of representations are their role in standing-in for features external to the system and their format. DST advocates sometimes claim to have repudiated the need for stand-ins in DST models, but I argue that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  • Physical Education, Cognition and Agency.Andrew Reid - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (9):921-933.
    Traditional analytical philosophy of education assigns a peripheral place to physical education, partly because orthodox epistemology finds its cognitive claims implausible. An understandable but dubious response to this state of affairs is the attempt to relocate physical education within the academic curriculum, with its characteristic emphasis on theoretical knowledge and formal assessment. Dissatisfaction with this response suggests an analysis of physical activity in terms of practical knowledge or knowing how, but the results of this seem inconclusive. More recently, the development (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Editor's Introduction and Review: Coordination and Context in Cognitive Science.Christopher T. Kello - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):6-17.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Discussions Dynamical Explanation in Cognitive Science.Keld Stehr Nielsen - 2006 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 37 (1):139-163.
    Applying the concepts of dynamical systems theory to explain cognitive phenomena is still a fairly recent trend in cognitive science and its potential and consequences are not nearly mapped out. A decade ago, dynamical approaches were introduced as a paradigm shift in cognitive science and in this paper I concentrate on how to substantiate this claim. After having considered and rejected the possibility that continuous time is the crucial factor, I present Kelso’s model of a near-cognitive phenomenon which invokes self-organization (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • After the Philosophy of Mind: Replacing Scholasticism with Science.Tony Chemero & Michael Silberstein - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (1):1-27.
    We provide a taxonomy of the two most important debates in the philosophy of the cognitive and neural sciences. The first debate is over methodological individualism: is the object of the cognitive and neural sciences the brain, the whole animal, or the animal--environment system? The second is over explanatory style: should explanation in cognitive and neural science be reductionist-mechanistic, inter-level mechanistic, or dynamical? After setting out the debates, we discuss the ways in which they are interconnected. Finally, we make some (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  • In Defense of Representation.Arthur B. Markman & Eric Dietrich - 2000 - Cognitive Psychology 40 (2):138--171.
    The computational paradigm, which has dominated psychology and artificial intelligence since the cognitive revolution, has been a source of intense debate. Recently, several cognitive scientists have argued against this paradigm, not by objecting to computation, but rather by objecting to the notion of representation. Our analysis of these objections reveals that it is not the notion of representation per se that is causing the problem, but rather specific properties of representations as they are used in various psychological theories. Our analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • How the Mind Grows: A Developmental Perspective on the Biology of Cognition.Paul E. Griffiths & Karola Stotz - 2000 - Synthese 122 (1-2):29-51.
    The 'developmental systems' perspective in biology is intended to replace the idea of a genetic program. This new perspective is strongly convergent with recent work in psychology on situated/embodied cognition and on the role of external 'scaffolding' in cognitive development. Cognitive processes, including those which can be explained in evolutionary terms, are not 'inherited' or produced in accordance with an inherited program. Instead, they are constructed in each generation through the interaction of a range of developmental resources. The attractors which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • On the Relationship Between Naturalistic Semantics and Individuation Criteria for Terms in a Language of Thought.Robert D. Rupert - 1998 - Synthese 117 (1):95-131.
    Naturalistically minded philosophers hope to identify a privileged nonsemantic relation that holds between a mental representation m and that which m represents, a relation whose privileged status underwrites the assignment of reference to m. The naturalist can accomplish this task only if she has in hand a nonsemantic criterion for individuating mental representations: it would be question-begging for the naturalist to characterize m, for the purpose of assigning content, as 'the representation with such and such content'. If we individuate mental (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • The Dynamics of Embodiment: A Field Theory of Infant Perseverative Reaching.Esther Thelen, Gregor Schöner, Christian Scheier & Linda B. Smith - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):1-34.
    The overall goal of this target article is to demonstrate a mechanism for an embodied cognition. The particular vehicle is a much-studied, but still widely debated phenomenon seen in 7–12 month-old-infants. In Piaget's classic “A-not-B error,” infants who have successfully uncovered a toy at location “A” continue to reach to that location even after they watch the toy hidden in a nearby location “B.” Here, we question the traditional explanations of the error as an indicator of infants' concepts of objects (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   112 citations  
  • Perception and Action: Alternative Views.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Synthese 129 (1):3-40.
    A traditional view of perception and action makestwo assumptions: that the causal flow betweenperception and action is primarily linear or one-way,and that they are merely instrumentally related toeach other, so that each is a means to the other.Either or both of these assumptions can be rejected. Behaviorism rejects the instrumental but not theone-way aspect of the traditional view, thus leavingitself open to charges of verificationism. Ecologicalviews reject the one-way aspect but not theinstrumental aspect of the traditional view, so thatperception and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  • Self-Directed Agents.W. D. Christensen & C. A. Hooker - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (sup1):18-52.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • What Do Double Dissociations Prove?G. Van Orden - 2001 - Cognitive Science 25 (1):111-172.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • From Cell-Surface Receptors to Higher Learning: A Whole World of Experience.Karola Stotz & Colin Allen - 2012 - In Philosophy of Behavioral Biology, eds, Katie Plaisance and Thomas Reydon. Boston: Springer. pp. 85-123.
    In the last decade it has become en vogue for cognitive comparative psychologists to study animal behavior in an ‘integrated’ fashion to account for both the ‘innate’ and the ‘acquired’. We will argue that these studies, instead of really integrating the concepts of ‘nature’ and ‘nurture’, rather cement this old dichotomy. They combine empty nativist interpretation of behavior systems with blatantly environmentalist explanations of learning. We identify the main culprit as the failure to take development seriously. While in some areas (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Author’s Response: Talia Morag: Emotion, Imagination, and the Limits of Reason. Abingdon, Oxon & New York: Routledge, 2016, 288 Pp, £88.00 HB.Talia Morag - 2017 - Metascience 26 (3):401-408.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Infant Single Words for Dynamic Events Predict Early Verb Meanings.Lorraine McCune & Ellen Herr-Israel - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):629-653.
    Do children’s single words related to motion and change also encode aspects of environmental events highlighted by Talmy’s motion event analysis? If so, these meanings may predict children’s early verb meanings. Analyzing the kinds of meanings expressed in single “dynamic event words” through motion event semantics yields links between early true verbs in sentences and the semantics encoded in these single words. Dynamic event words reflect the sense of temporal and spatial reversibility established in the late sensorimotor period. We propose (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Interactivist-Constructivist Approach to Intelligence: Self-Directed Anticipative Learning.Wayne D. Christensen & Clifford A. Hooker - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):5 – 45.
    This paper outlines an original interactivist-constructivist approach to modelling intelligence and learning as a dynamical embodied form of adaptiveness and explores some applications of I-C to understanding the way cognitive learning is realized in the brain. Two key ideas for conceptualizing intelligence within this framework are developed. These are: intelligence is centrally concerned with the capacity for coherent, context-sensitive, self-directed management of interaction; and the primary model for cognitive learning is anticipative skill construction. Self-directedness is a capacity for integrative process (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Mechanistic and Non-Mechanistic Varieties of Dynamical Models in Cognitive Science: Explanatory Power, Understanding, and the ‘Mere Description’ Worry.Raoul Gervais - 2015 - Synthese 192 (1):43-66.
    In the literature on dynamical models in cognitive science, two issues have recently caused controversy. First, what is the relation between dynamical and mechanistic models? I will argue that dynamical models can be upgraded to be mechanistic as well, and that there are mechanistic and non-mechanistic dynamical models. Second, there is the issue of explanatory power. Since it is uncontested the mechanistic models can explain, I will focus on the non-mechanistic variety of dynamical models. It is often claimed by proponents (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Ingredients for a Postgenomic Synthesis of Nature and Nurture.Karola Stotz - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (3):359 – 381.
    This paper serves as an introduction to the special issue on “Reconciling Nature and Nurture in Behavior and Cognition Research” and sets its agenda to resolve the 'interactionist' dichotomy of nature as the genetic, and stable, factors of development, and nurture as the environmental, and plastic influences. In contrast to this received view it promotes the idea that all traits, no matter how developmentally fixed or universal they seem, contingently develop out of a single-cell state through the interaction of a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Towards a Science of Informed Matter.Evelyn Fox Keller - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (2):174-179.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Towards a Science of Informed Matter.Evelyn Fox Keller - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (2):174-179.
    Over the last couple of decades, a call has begun to resound in a number of distinct fields of inquiry for a reattachment of form to matter, for an understanding of ‘information’ as inherently embodied, or, as Jean-Marie Lehn calls it, for a “science of informed matter.” We hear this call most clearly in chemistry, in cognitive science, in molecular computation, and in robotics—all fields looking to biological processes to ground a new epistemology. The departure from the values of a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations