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  1. Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics: The Enron Effect—Love of Money, Corporate Ethical Values, Corruption Perceptions Index, and Dishonesty Across 31 Geopolitical Entities.Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Toto Sutarso, Mahfooz A. Ansari, Vivien K. G. Lim, Thompson S. H. Teo, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Ilya E. Garber, Randy Ki-Kwan Chiu, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Peter Vlerick, Adebowale Akande, Michael W. Allen, Abdulgawi Salim Al-Zubaidi, Mark G. Borg, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Rosario Correia, Linzhi Du, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim, Chin-Kang Jen, Ali Mahdi Kazem, Kilsun Kim, Jian Liang, Eva Malovics, Alice S. Moreira, Richard T. Mpoyi, Anthony Ugochukwu Obiajulu Nnedum, Johnsto E. Osagie, AAhad M. Osman-Gani, Mehmet Ferhat Özbek, Francisco José Costa Pereira, Ruja Pholsward, Horia D. Pitariu, Marko Polic, Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska, Petar Skobic, Allen F. Stembridge, Theresa Li-Na Tang, Caroline Urbain, Martina Trontelj, Luigina Canova, Anna Maria Manganelli, Jingqiu Chen, Ningyu Tang, Bolanle E. Adetoun & Modupe F. Adewuyi - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):919-937.
    Monetary intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the dark side of monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics—dishonesty. Dishonesty, a risky prospect, involves cost–benefit analysis of self-interest. We frame good or bad barrels in the environmental context as a proxy of high or low probability of getting caught for dishonesty, respectively. We theorize: The magnitude and intensity of (...)
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  • Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics Across 32 Cultures: Good Apples Enjoy Good Quality of Life in Good Barrels.Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Toto Sutarso, Mahfooz A. Ansari, Vivien Kim Geok Lim, Thompson Sian Hin Teo, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Ilya E. Garber, Randy Ki-Kwan Chiu, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Peter Vlerick, Adebowale Akande, Michael W. Allen, Abdulgawi Salim Al-Zubaidi, Mark G. Borg, Luigina Canova, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Rosario Correia, Linzhi Du, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim, Chin-Kang Jen, Ali Mahdi Kazem, Kilsun Kim, Jian Liang, Eva Malovics, Anna Maria Manganelli, Alice S. Moreira, Richard T. Mpoyi, Anthony Ugochukwu Obiajulu Nnedum, Johnsto E. Osagie, AAhad M. Osman-Gani, Mehmet Ferhat Özbek, Francisco José Costa Pereira, Ruja Pholsward, Horia D. Pitariu, Marko Polic, Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska, Petar Skobic, Allen F. Stembridge, Theresa Li-Na Tang, Caroline Urbain, Martina Trontelj, Jingqiu Chen & Ningyu Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):893-917.
    Monetary Intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the bright side of Monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics, frames money attitude in the context of pay and life satisfaction, and controls money at the macro-level and micro-level. We theorize: Managers with low love of money motive but high stewardship behavior will have high subjective well-being: pay satisfaction and (...)
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  • How Government Spending Impacts Tax Compliance.Diana Falsetta, Jennifer K. Schafer & George T. Tsakumis - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 190 (2):513-530.
    This study examines how taxpayer support for government spending can improve tax compliance. While there is ample evidence on the deterrent effect of audit probability on taxpayer noncompliance, there is no evidence related to the moderating role that taxpayer support may have on compliance behavior. We also examine the moderating role that taxpayer ethics plays in compliance decisions. Results of our study indicate that the level of taxpayer support influences taxpayer compliance decisions, in that those with greater support for how (...)
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  • Spiritual Leadership and Employee CSR Participation: A Probe from a Sensemaking Perspective.WenChi Zou, BaoWen Lin, Ling Su & Jeffery D. Houghton - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 186 (3):695-709.
    This study via the sensemaking perspective examines whether spiritual leadership can influence employee workplace spirituality and employee corporate social responsibility (CSR) participation. We also examine the joint effects of spiritual leadership and employee Machiavellianism on employee workplace spirituality. Using a sample of 556 employees from four commercial banks in China, analyses demonstrate that employee workplace spirituality mediates the relationship between spiritual leadership and employee CSR participation and that the indirect effect of spiritual leadership on employee CSR participation is dependent on (...)
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  • When will an unethical follower receive poor performance ratings? It depends on the leader’s moral characteristics.Guanglei Zhang, Jianghua Mao & Beier Hong - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (5):413-430.
    ABSTRACT Leaders have been thought to play a vital role in influencing employees’ unethical behavior. However, what happens to leaders and followers in the aftermath of unethical conduct has received little attention in the literature. Drawing from the correspondent inference theory, we examine the conditions under which leaders attribute their followers’ unethical behavior to poor moral character and eventually assign them low performance ratings. Through a two-wave research design and data from 290 matched employee–leader dyads, we found that a leader (...)
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  • Theory of Justice, OCB, and Individualism: Kyrgyz Citizens.Mehmet Ferhat Özbek, Mohammad Asif Yoldash & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (2):365-382.
    Research suggests that organizational justice has important impacts on work-related attitudes and behaviors, such as organizational citizenship behavior. In this article, we explore the extent to which individualism moderates the relationship between organizational justice and OCB among citizens in Kyrgyzstan. We make additional contributions to the literature because we know very little about these constructs in this former Soviet Union country, Kyrgyzstan, an under-researched and under-represented region of the world. Results of our data collected from 402 managers and employees in (...)
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  • Toward an Ethical Theory of Organizing.Naveed Yazdani & Hasan S. Murad - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):399-417.
    Current organizations are underpinned by utilitarian ethics of Modernity. Pure economic motive driven organizations detach themselves from larger societal interest. Rising number of corporate scandals and intraorganizational income inequalities are breeding similar trends in society at large. Current organizations base their competitive advantage on resources and capabilities which boils down to economic supremacy at all cost whether it is named I/o or RBV of the firm. This theoretical article posits Ethics-based Trust as the main competency and capability for attaining sustained (...)
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  • When Employees Stop Talking and Start Fighting: The Detrimental Effects of Pseudo Voice in Organizations. [REVIEW]Gerdien Vries, Karen A. Jehn & Bart W. Terwel - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):221-230.
    Many organizations offer their employees the opportunity to voice their opinions about work-related issues because of the positive consequences associated with offering such an opportunity. However, little attention has been given to the possibility that offering voice may have negative effects as well. We propose that negative consequences are particularly likely to occur when employees perceive the opportunity to voice opinions to be “pseudo voice”—voice opportunity given by managers who do not have the intention to actually consider employee input (i.e., (...)
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  • A Meta-analytic Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Delivery in Ethics Instruction: The Case for a Hybrid Approach.E. Michelle Todd, Logan L. Watts, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Brett S. Torrence, Megan R. Turner, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (6):1719-1754.
    Despite the growing body of literature on training in the responsible conduct of research, few studies have examined the effectiveness of delivery formats used in ethics courses. The present effort sought to address this gap in the literature through a meta-analytic review of 66 empirical studies, representing 106 ethics courses and 10,069 participants. The frequency and effectiveness of 67 instructional and process-based content areas were also assessed for each delivery format. Process-based contents were best delivered face-to-face, whereas contents delivered online (...)
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  • The Matthew Effect in monetary wisdom.Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2021 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 10 (2):153-181.
    Robert King Merton’s article published in Science popularized the Matthew Effect: “For to everyone who has, more will be given and he will grow rich; but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away”. The Matthew Effect prevails at the individual, organization-industry, and country-global levels. This interdisciplinary review connects the Holy Bible with agency theory, tournament theory, corporate social responsibility, prospect theory, behavioral economics, the psychology of money, and business ethics in the literature. I (...)
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  • Theory of Monetary Intelligence: Money Attitudes—Religious Values, Making Money, Making Ethical Decisions, and Making the Grade.Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):583-603.
    This study explores the effect of a short ethics intervention—a chapter of business ethics in a business course—on perceptions of business courses and personal values toward making money and making ethical decisions and Monetary Intelligence. Since attitudes predict intentions and behaviors, Monetary Intelligence, a form of social intelligence, is defined as the extent to which individuals monitor their own monetary motive, behavior, and cognition; apply the information to evaluate critical concerns and options; select strategies to achieve financial goals; and reach (...)
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  • Love of Money and Unethical Behavior Intention: Does an Authentic Supervisor’s Personal Integrity and Character Make a Difference? [REVIEW]Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Hsi Liu - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):295-312.
    We investigate the extent to which perceptions of the authenticity of supervisor’s personal integrity and character (ASPIRE) moderate the relationship between people’s love of money (LOM) and propensity to engage in unethical behavior (PUB) among 266 part-time employees who were also business students in a five-wave panel study. We found that a high level of ASPIRE perceptions was related to high love-of-money orientation, high self-esteem, but low unethical behavior intention (PUB). Unethical behavior intention (PUB) was significantly correlated with their high (...)
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  • Finding the Lost Sheep: A Panel Study of Business Students' Intrinsic Religiosity, Machiavellianism, and Unethical Behavior Intentions.Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (5):352-379.
    This research investigates 266 business students' panel data across 4 time periods and tests a theoretical model involving intrinsic religiosity, the love of money, Machiavellianism, and propensity to engage in unethical behaviors. There was a short ethics intervention between Times 3 and 4. We identified good apples and bad apples using the PUB measure collected at Time 4. From Time 3 to Time 4, good apples became more ethical, whereas bad apples became less ethical after the ethics intervention. Moreover, for (...)
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  • Falling or Not Falling into Temptation? Multiple Faces of Temptation, Monetary Intelligence, and Unethical Intentions Across Gender.Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Toto Sutarso - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):529-552.
    We develop a theoretical model, explore the relationship between temptation (both reflective and formative) and unethical intentions by treating monetary intelligence (MI) as a mediator, and examine the direct (temptation to unethical intentions) and indirect (temptation to MI to unethical intentions) paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected from 340 part-time employees and university (business) students. The positive indirect path suggested that yielding to temptation (e.g., high cognitive impairment and lack of self-control) led to poor MI (low stewardship behavior, (...)
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  • Detecting Honest People’s Lies in Handwriting: The Power of the Ten Commandments and Internalized Ethical Values.Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):389-400.
    Can managers detect honest people’s lies in a handwritten message? In this article, I will briefly discuss graphology and a basic model of interpersonal communication. I will then develop a fundamental theoretical framework of eight principles for detecting lies based on the basic communication model, handwriting analyses, and the following assumptions: For most people, it is easier to tell the truth than to tell lies. This applies to handwritings also. When most honest people lie, they try to hide their stressful (...)
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  • Are You Satisfied With Your Pay When You Compare? It Depends on Your Love of Money, Pay Comparison Standards, and Culture.Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Roberto Luna-Arocas - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):279-289.
    We develop a theoretical model of income and pay comparison satisfaction with two mediators, examine the direct and the indirect paths of our model, and treat culture as a moderator. Based on 311 professors in the US and Spain, we demonstrate a positive direct path and a negative indirect path. Our subsequent multi-group analysis illustrates: For American professors, their direct path shows that income is directly related to high pay comparison satisfaction. Their indirect path reveals the following new insights: Professors (...)
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  • Behavioral economics: who are the investors with the most sustainable stock happiness, and why? Low aspiration, external control, and country domicile may save your lives—monetary wisdom.Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Zhen Li & Ningyu Tang - 2022 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2):359-397.
    Slight absolute changes in the Shanghai Stock Exchange Index (SHSE) corresponded to the city’s immediate increases in coronary heart disease deaths and stroke deaths. Significant fluctuations in the Shenzhen Stock Exchange Index (SZSE) corresponded to the country’s minor, delayed death rates. Investors deal with money, greed, stock volatility, and risky decision-making. Happy people live longer and better. We ask the following question: Who are the investors with the highest and most sustainable stock happiness, and why? Monetary wisdom asserts: Investors apply (...)
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  • Coping Intelligence: Coping Strategies and Organizational Commitment Among Boundary Spanning Employees.Rajesh Srivastava & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (3):525-542.
    In this study, we develop a new theoretical framework of Coping Intelligence which examines relationships between coping strategies and organizational commitment among boundary spanning employees. We collected data from 452 boundary spanning salespeople using multiple sources. Results demonstrate that a formative model of Coping Intelligence is superior to a reflective model and that problem-focused coping contributes to CI which, in turn, is related to affective and normative commitment. Further, our more parsimonious formative model illustrates that positive problem-focused coping and negative (...)
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  • The Influence of Love of Money and Religiosity on Ethical Decision-Making in Marketing.Anusorn Singhapakdi, Scott J. Vitell, Dong-Jin Lee, Amiee Mellon Nisius & Grace B. Yu - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):183-191.
    The impact of “love of money” on different aspects of consumers’ ethical beliefs has been investigated by previous research. In this study we investigate the potential impact of “love of money” on a manager’s ethical decision-making in marketing. Another objective of the current study is to investigate the potential impacts of extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity on ethical marketing decision-making. We also include ethical judgments as an element of ethical decision-making. We found “love of money”, both dimensions of religiosity, and ethical (...)
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  • The Moderating Roles of Follower Conscientiousness and Agreeableness on the Relationship Between Peer Transparency and Follower Transparency.Cass Shum, Anthony Gatling, Laura Book & Billy Bai - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):483-495.
    Transparency is an underpinning of workplace ethics. However, most of the existing research has focused on the relationship between leader transparency and its consequences. Drawing on social and self-regulation theory research, we examine the antecedents of followers’ transparency. Specifically, we propose that followers have higher levels of transparency when they are working with peers who have a high level of transparency. We further suggest that followers’ conscientiousness and agreeableness moderate the relationship between peer transparency and followers’ transparency. Using a time-lagged (...)
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  • Work-Related Behavioral Intentions in Macedonia: Coping Strategies, Work Environment, Love of Money, Job Satisfaction, and Demographic Variables. [REVIEW]Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):373-391.
    Based on theory of planned behavior, we develop a theoretical model involving love of money (LOM), job satisfaction (attitude), coping strategies/responses (perceived behavioral control), work environment (subjective norm), and work-related behavioral intentions (behavioral intention). We tested this model using job satisfaction as a mediator and sector (public versus private), personal character (good apples versus bad apples), gender, and income as moderators in a sample of 515 employees and their managers in the Republic of Macedonia. For the whole sample, both coping (...)
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  • Testing a Model of Behavioral Intentions in the Republic of Macedonia: Differences Between the Private and the Public Sectors.Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):495-517.
    In this study, we developed a model of unethical behavior intentions, collected data from managers of the private (n = 208) and the public (n = 307) sectors in the Republic of Macedonia, and tested our model across these two sectors. Results suggested that for both sectors, unethical behavior intentions were not related to the love of money and corporate ethical values, whereas irritation was negatively related to life satisfaction. Moreover, corporate ethical values were related to life satisfaction for the (...)
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  • Monetary Intelligence: Money Attitudes—Unethical Intentions, Intrinsic and Extrinsic Job Satisfaction, and Coping Strategies Across Public and Private Sectors in Macedonia.Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):93-115.
    Research suggests that attitudes guide individuals’ thinking and actions. In this study, we explore the monetary intelligence construct and investigate the relationships between a formative model of money attitudes involving affective, behavioral, and cognitive components and several sets of outcome variables—unethical intentions, intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction, and coping strategies. Based on 515 managers in the Republic of Macedonia, we test our model for the whole sample and also cross sector and gender. Managers’ negative stewardship behavior and positive cognitive meaning (...)
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  • Impacts of peers’ unethical behavior on employees’ ethical intention: Moderated mediation by Machiavellian orientation.Pablo Ruiz-Palomino, Alexis Bañón-Gomis & Jorge Linuesa-Langreo - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (2):185-205.
    Research suggests a direct negative relationship between peers’ unethical behavior and employees’ ethical intention. But several possible mechanisms might explain this relationship in more detail. For example, Machiavellianism is a personality trait characterized by interpersonal manipulation and the use of unethical means to achieve certain self‐interested ends, whether useful or pleasant. This article adopts an Aristotelian understanding of philia, related to three goods on which human relationships rest: useful, pleasant, and honest. We propose that Machiavellianism, a self‐interested, pragmatic personality orientation, (...)
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  • The Impact of Situational Influences on Corruption in Organizations.Tanja Rabl - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):85 - 101.
    The literature states that both situational and individual factors contribute to corrupt behavior. This study investigates the influence of rarely empirically investigated situational factors - the size of the bribe, time pressure, and the degree of abstractness of the business code - on the Model of Corrupt Action that describes the subjective decision making process of corrupt actors. To test the effects, I used an experimental simulation design. Only few effects were found. Thus, my results show a certain robustness of (...)
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  • Relationships Between Machiavellianism, Organizational Culture, and Workplace Bullying: Emotional Abuse from the Target’s and the Perpetrator’s Perspective.Irena Pilch & Elżbieta Turska - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):83-93.
    Exposure to bullying at work is a serious social stressor, having important consequences for the victim, the co-workers, and the whole organization. Bullying can be understood as a multi-causal phenomenon: the result of individual differences between workers, deficiencies in the work environment or an interaction between individual and situational factors. The results of the previous studies confirmed that some characteristics within an individual may predispose to bullying others and/or being bullied. In the present study, we intend to clarify the relationships (...)
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  • How South African societal and circumstantial influences affect the ethical standards of prospective South African Chartered Accountants.Dana Nathan - 2015 - African Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1).
  • Review of Instructional Approaches in Ethics Education. [REVIEW]Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Logan L. Watts, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (3):883-912.
    Increased investment in ethics education has prompted a variety of instructional objectives and frameworks. Yet, no systematic procedure to classify these varying instructional approaches has been attempted. In the present study, a quantitative clustering procedure was conducted to derive a typology of instruction in ethics education. In total, 330 ethics training programs were included in the cluster analysis. The training programs were appraised with respect to four instructional categories including instructional content, processes, delivery methods, and activities. Eight instructional approaches were (...)
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  • Religious Beliefs Inspire Sustainable HOPE (Help Ourselves Protect the Environment): Culture, Religion, Dogma, and Liturgy—The Matthew Effect in Religious Social Responsibility.Yalin Mo, Junyu Zhao & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 184 (3):665-685.
    China has achieved economic prominence but damaged the natural environment. Can religions excite pro-environmental actions? Chinese religion encompasses Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, native Taoism, and indigenous folk beliefs (GuanDi and Mazu). We theorize that believers demonstrate more sustainable HOPE (Help Ourselves Protect the Environment) than non-believers. Religions with standardized and formal liturgy show more pro-environmental HOPE than those without it. We challenge the myth that the believers of Christianity and Islam display more sustainable HOPE than other faith. The 2013 Chinese General (...)
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  • How ethical and political identifications drive adaptive behavior in the digital piracy context.Dario Miocevic & Ivana Kursan Milakovic - 2022 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 32 (1):256-273.
    Today, digital piracy remains a growing challenge for both legislators and businesses operating in the entertainment industry. This study explores when and why consumers make trade-offs between illegal and legal streaming services. By drawing on protection motivation theory, we find that consumers' threat and coping appraisals increase their adaptive behavior, i.e., lower intention to consume illegal and higher intention to consume legal streaming services. We also show that the strength of consumers' inherent ethical (relativism) and political (economic liberalism) identities conditions (...)
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  • An Examination of the Contribution of Dispositional Affect on Ethical Lapses.D. Jordan Lowe & Philip M. J. Reckers - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):179-193.
    The popular press and academic research has focused primarily on the characteristics of corporate leaders. Subordinates have been studied much less frequently than leaders and yet they play a pivotal role in destructive leadership processes. An area holding significant potential to bring clarity to subordinates’ ability to withstand (or succumb) to pressures from superiors is dispositional affect. In our exploratory study, we examine how specific affective states influence subordinates’ unethical behavior. We performed an experiment with 63 mid-level managers having significant (...)
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  • Money is Power: Monetary Intelligence—Love of Money and Temptation of Materialism Among Czech University Students. [REVIEW]Soňa Lemrová, Eva Reiterová, Renáta Fatěnová, Karel Lemr & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2).
    In this study, we develop a theoretical model of monetary intelligence (MI), explore the extent to which individuals’ meaning of money is related to the pursuit of materialistic purposes, and test our model using the whole sample and across college major and gender. We select the 15-item love of money (LOM) construct—Factors Good, Evil (Affective), Budget (Behavioral), Achievement, and Power (Cognitive)—from the Money Ethic Scale and Factors Success and Centrality and two indicators—from the Materialism Scale. Based on our data collected (...)
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  • Teaching Critical Thinking Skills: Ability, Motivation, Intervention, and the Pygmalion Effect.M. Jill Austin, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Larry W. Howard - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):133-147.
    Using a Solomon four-group design, we investigate the effect of a case-based critical thinking intervention on students’ critical thinking skills. We randomly assign 31 sessions of business classes to four groups and collect data from three sources: in-class performance, university records, and Internet surveys. Our 2 × 2 ANOVA results showed no significant between-subjects differences. Contrary to our expectations, students improve their critical thinking skills, with or without the intervention. Female and Caucasian students improve their critical thinking skills, but males (...)
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  • Violation of Buddhist Five Precepts, Money Consciousness, and the Tendency to Pay Bribes among Organizational Employees in Bangkok, Thailand.Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs & Chanchira Hongladarom - 2011 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (3):325-344.
    This study examines the relationships between violation of the Buddhist Five Precepts, money consciousness, and the tendency to pay bribes among organizational employees in Bangkok, Thailand. A total of 385 organizational employees in Bangkok participated in the study. Structural equation models were used to test the relationships. The fitted model shows a mediation effect of money consciousness on the relationship between violation of the Buddhist Five Precepts and the tendency to pay bribes. Results indicate that the extent of violation of (...)
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  • Stealing Time at Work: Attitudes, Social Pressure, and Perceived Control as Predictors of Time Theft.Christine A. Henle, Charlie L. Reeve & Virginia E. Pitts - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):53-67.
    Organizations have long struggled to find ways to reduce the occurrence of unethical behaviors by employees. Unfortunately, time theft, a common and costly form of ethical misconduct at work, has been understudied by ethics researchers. In order to remedy this gap in the literature, we used the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to investigate the antecedents of time theft, which includes behaviors such as arriving later to or leaving earlier from work than scheduled, taking additional or longer breaks than is (...)
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  • Shedding light on the relationships between Machiavellianism, career ambition, and unethical behavior intention.Mert Gürlek - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (1):38-59.
    Despite the long history of career research in the literature (Guerrier, 1987; Siu et al., 1997), researchers have largely neglected the dark sides of the antecedents and consequences of career amb...
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  • Youth materialism and consumer ethics: do Gen Z adolescents’ self-concepts (power and self-esteem) vary across cultures (China vs. France)?Elodie Gentina & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2024 - Ethics and Behavior 34 (2):120-150.
    Youth materialism excites adolescents’ unethical consumer beliefs (UCB-dishonesty). We develop a second-stage moderated mediation model, investigate the relationships between materialism and Generation Z teenagers’ consumer ethics (UCB-dishonesty), and treat two self-concept mechanisms (power and self-esteem) as dual mediators and culture as a moderator (China vs. France). We theorize that materialism enhances power (public self) and reduces self-esteem (private self). French adolescents’ sense of power increases UCB more than their Chinese counterparts. Chinese teenagers’ self-esteem reduces UCB more than their French counterparts. (...)
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  • Mindfulness Reduces Avaricious Monetary Attitudes and Enhances Ethical Consumer Beliefs: Mindfulness Training, Timing, and Practicing Matter.Elodie Gentina, Carole Daniel & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):301-323.
    Mindfulness—the awareness of the present moment and experiences in daily life—contributes to genuine intrinsic and social-oriented values and curbs materialistic and hedonistic values. In the context of materialism, money is power. Avaricious individuals take risks and are likely to engage in dishonesty. Very little research has investigated the effects of mindfulness in reducing the avaricious monetary attitudes and enhancing ethical consumer beliefs. In this study, we theorize that mindfulness improves consumer ethics directly and indirectly by lowering avaricious monetary attitudes. To (...)
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  • Do Parents and Peers Influence Adolescents’ Monetary Intelligence and Consumer Ethics? French and Chinese Adolescents and Behavioral Economics.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):115-140.
    Adolescents have increasing discretionary income, expenditures, and purchasing power. Inventory shrinkage costs $123.4 billion globally to retail outlets. Adolescents are disproportionately responsible for theft and shoplifting. Both parents and peers significantly influence adolescents’ monetary values, materialism, and dishonesty as consumers. In this study, we develop a theoretical model involving teenagers’ social attachment and their consumer ethics, treat adolescents’ money attitude in the context of youth materialism as a mediator, and simultaneously examine the direct and indirect paths. Results of 1018 adolescents (...)
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  • Coping with Loneliness Through Materialism: Strategies Matter for Adolescent Development of Unethical Behaviors.Elodie Gentina, L. J. Shrum & Tina M. Lowrey - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):103-122.
    Engaging in unethical consumption behaviors is an acute societal problem that can have severe consequences for adolescents, and businesses in particular have been accused of making such consumption particularly appealing and accessible. However, the causes of unethical behaviors are not well understood and research on the causes has been mixed. In this research, we investigate the effects of coping strategies for loneliness on adolescents’ adoption of unethical behaviors, a topic that business ethics research has not explored. In a large-scale study (...)
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  • Does Bad Company Corrupt Good Morals? Social Bonding and Academic Cheating among French and Chinese Teens.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):639-667.
    A well-known common wisdom asserts that strong social bonds undermine delinquency. However, there is little empirical evidence to substantiate this assertion regarding adolescence academic cheating across cultures. In this study, we adopt social bonding theory and develop a theoretical model involving four social bonds and adolescence self-reported academic cheating behavior and cheating perception. Based on 913 adolescents in France and China, we show that parental attachment, academic commitment, and moral values curb academic cheating; counterintuitively, peer involvement contributes to cheating. We (...)
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  • An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power, and Materialism.Elodie Gentina, L. J. Shrum, Tina M. Lowrey, Scott J. Vitell & Gregory M. Rose - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1173-1186.
    What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethical beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we (...)
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  • Status Differentiation and the Protean Self: A Social-Cognitive Model of Unethical Behavior in Organizations. [REVIEW]Bella L. Galperin, Rebecca J. Bennett & Karl Aquino - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):407 - 424.
    Based on social-cognitive theory, this article proposes a model that seeks to explain why high status organizational members engage in unethical behavior. We argue that status differentiation in organizations creates social isolation which initiates activation of high status group identity and a deactivation of moral identity. We further argue that high status group identity results in insensitivity to the needs of out-group members which, in turn, results in lessened motivation to selfregulate ethical decision making. As a result of this identity (...)
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  • What is Working, What is Not, and What We Need to Know: a Meta-Analytic Review of Business Ethics Instruction.Kelsey E. Medeiros, Logan L. Watts, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):245-275.
    Requirements for business ethics education and organizational ethics trainings mark an important step in encouraging ethical behavior among business students and professionals. However, the lack of specificity in these guidelines as to how, what, and where business ethics should be taught has led to stark differences in approaches and content. The present effort uses meta-analytic procedures to examine the effectiveness of current approaches across organizational ethics trainings and business school courses. to provide practical suggestions for business ethics interventions and research. (...)
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  • Validation of a Digital Work Simulation to Assess Machiavellianism and Compliant Behavior.Lonneke Dubbelt, Janneke K. Oostrom, Annemarie M. F. Hiemstra & Joost P. L. Modderman - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (3):619-637.
    ”This paper describes a new and innovative measure that is developed to predict workplace deviance through the measurement of Machiavellianism and Compliant Behavior. Two field studies were conducted to study the validity of the digital work simulation. In Study 1, support was found for the construct validity of the simulation. The constructs as measured with the simulation correlated significantly with self-reported measures of the constructs and were related to personality and self-esteem. Study 2 examined the criterion-related validity of the simulation (...)
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  • When Employees Stop Talking and Start Fighting: The Detrimental Effects of Pseudo Voice in Organizations.Gerdien de Vries, Karen A. Jehn & Bart W. Terwel - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):221-230.
    Many organizations offer their employees the opportunity to voice their opinions about work-related issues because of the positive consequences associated with offering such an opportunity. However, little attention has been given to the possibility that offering voice may have negative effects as well. We propose that negative consequences are particularly likely to occur when employees perceive the opportunity to voice opinions to be “pseudo voice”—voice opportunity given by managers who do not have the intention to actually consider employee input (i.e., (...)
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  • What is Working, What is Not, and What We Need to Know: a Meta-Analytic Review of Business Ethics Instruction.Shane Connelly, Michael D. Mumford, Logan M. Steele, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan L. Watts & Kelsey E. Medeiros - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):245-275.
    Requirements for business ethics education and organizational ethics trainings mark an important step in encouraging ethical behavior among business students and professionals. However, the lack of specificity in these guidelines as to how, what, and where business ethics should be taught has led to stark differences in approaches and content. The present effort uses meta-analytic procedures to examine the effectiveness of current approaches across organizational ethics trainings and business school courses. to provide practical suggestions for business ethics interventions and research. (...)
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  • Demonstrating the Need for Effective Business Ethics: An Alternative Approach.Jason Childs - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (2):221-232.
    Since the financial crisis, the malfeasance of business leaders has been a recurring theme in the news, along with calls for increased regulation and oversight. This focus on the ethics of the business community raises a concern about the ethics of those in business or going into business. The ethics of business people and business students has been explored by a number of researchers using survey techniques. We propose and report the results of an alternative method for investigating unethical behavior (...)
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  • Temptation, Monetary Intelligence (Love of Money), and Environmental Context on Unethical Intentions and Cheating.Jingqiu Chen, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Ningyu Tang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):197-219.
    In Study 1, we test a theoretical model involving temptation, monetary intelligence (MI), a mediator, and unethical intentions and investigate the direct and indirect paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected in open classrooms from 492 American and 256 Chinese students. For the whole sample, temptation is related to low unethical intentions indirectly. Multi-group analyses reveal that temptation predicts unethical intentions both indirectly and directly for male American students only; but not for female American students. For Chinese students, both (...)
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  • The Bright and Dark Sides of Religiosity Among University Students: Do Gender, College Major, and Income Matter? [REVIEW]Yuh-Jia Chen & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):531-553.
    We develop a theoretical model involving religiosity [intrinsic (I), extrinsic-social (E s), and extrinsic-personal (E p), Time 1], Machiavellianism (Time 2), and propensity to engage in unethical behavior (Time 2) to investigate direct and indirect paths. We collected two-wave panel data from 359 students who had some work experiences. For the whole sample, intrinsic religiosity (I) indirectly curbed unethical intentions through the absence of Machiavellianism, the bright side of religiosity. Both extrinsic-social (E s) and extrinsic-personal (E p) directly, while extrinsic-social (...)
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